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New test fast-tracks diagnosis for malaria
 

A new invention can cheaply and accurately diagnose malaria infection in just a few minutes using only a droplet of blood, researchers have reported in the journal Nature MedicineA new invention can cheaply and accurately diagnose malaria infection in just a few minutes using only a droplet of blood, researchers have reported in the journal Nature Medicine. The tool could replace the laborious, error-prone method by which a lab technician looks for malaria parasites in blood through a microscope, they said. While that method is considered the gold standard in malaria diagnostics today, it depends on the technician's skill in interpreting the image, the quality of the microscope and lab chemicals and even on the thickness of the blood smear on the slide itself. The touted replacement is an "inexpensive" desk-top mini-lab that, according to its inventors, can detect fewer than 10 malaria parasites per microlitre of blood, using a sample of less than 10 microlitres -- equivalent to a small drop from a finger prick.



Health workers death toll mounts in W.Africa as Ebola spreads
 Nigeria's health minister will hold an emergency meeting of state health commissioners on Monday as West Africa struggles to halt the deadly Ebola virus, amid growing concern at the toll among healthcare workers. Nigeria on Sunday confirmed a fresh case of Ebola in a doctor whose husband died from the virus, adding to a growing list of those providing healthcare in West Africa to be hit by the epidemic. The woman's husband was also a doctor who died in the city of Port Harcourt on August 22 after treating a patient who had contact with the Liberian man who brought the virus to Nigeria in late July. She was in a stable condition at an isolation unit in the financial capital, Lagos, said Sampson Parker, the health commissioner of Rivers State, of which Port Harcourt is the capital.

Dozens arrested at Made in America music festival in Los Angeles
 

Woman sits after she was handcuffed by the authorities during the Made in American music festival in Los Angeles(Reuters) - Seven people were arrested on Sunday at the Made in America music festival in downtown Los Angeles, following an opening day that left more than two dozen people in handcuffs, police said. During Sunday's show at Grand Park there were four felony arrests, including one for battery and the rest for possession of narcotics, besides three misdemeanor arrests, including one charge of public drunkenness, the Los Angeles Police Department said. Another 23 people were given alcohol citations, an LAPD police spokeswoman said. So far about 27,000 tickets have been scanned for Sunday's full day of events, including top-billed stars John Mayer and Kanye West later in the evening.



Judge temporarily blocks law that could close all Louisiana abortion clinics
 

Gov. Bobby Jindal of LouisianaThe measure, signed into law by Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal in June and due to take effect Sept. 1, would require doctors who perform abortions to have patient admitting privileges at a hospital within 30 miles of their practice. "Plaintiffs will be allowed to operate lawfully while continuing their efforts to obtain privileges," Federal Judge John deGravelles wrote in the decision. Abortion rights activists applauded the decision, the latest in a string of rulings against similar measures, saying it would give doctors more time to seek hospital privileges. "Today’s ruling ensures Louisiana women are safe from an underhanded law that seeks to strip them of their health and rights," said Nancy Northup, president and chief executive of the Center for Reproductive Rights, which sued to block the law on behalf of three of the state's five clinics.



Dengue outbreak affects at least 22 in Japan
 

A worker sprays insecticide at the Yoyogi park, central Tokyo, believed to be the source of the mosquito-borne dengue fever, on August 28, 2014An outbreak of dengue fever in Japan -- the first since World War II -- has affected at least 22 people, the government said Monday, with all cases believed to be linked to a Tokyo park. The health ministry said 19 new infections have been confirmed since last week. All are believed to have visited Tokyo's Yoyogi Park or its environs, one of the major green lungs of the metropolis, popular with residents and tourists alike. The park, one of the largest open spaces in central Tokyo, is believed to be the source of the mosquito-borne disease.



Swedish hospital investigating possible case of Ebola: media
 STOCKHOLM (Reuters) - A hospital in the Swedish capital is investigating a possible case of Ebola, Swedish media reported on Sunday. A man who recently travelled to a "risk area" for the virus was taken to Karolinska University Hospital in Stockholm suffering from a fever and is being treated in an isolation unit, the reports said. More than 1,500 people have died in an Ebola outbreak in West Africa since March. ...

Cyberonics device improves heart function after Boston flop
 By Ben Hirschler BARCELONA (Reuters) - A nerve stimulation device from Cyberonics improved cardiac function in heart failure patients in a small clinical trial, in contrast to an unsuccessful study backed by Boston Scientific. Both companies are trying to improve outcomes for patients with heart failure, in which the heart fails to pump blood efficiently, by stimulating the vagus nerve – a superhighway connecting the brain to the rest of the body. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), which involves delivering mild electrical pulses to the nerve in the neck, is already used successfully to treat severe epilepsy and treatment-resistant depression.

'Most exciting ever' Novartis drug points to huge sales
 

Logo of Swiss drugmaker Novartis is seen at its headquarters in BaselBy Ben Hirschler BARCELONA (Reuters) - Sales forecasts for Novartis's new heart failure drug are being ramped up by analysts after strikingly good clinical trial results for a medicine doctors expect to transform treatment of the deadly disease. David Epstein, Novartis' head of pharmaceuticals, said the launch of the drug next year promised to be the company's most exciting ever and profit margins on the medicine would be good. The results of a keenly-awaited clinical trial on LCZ696 were released at the annual meeting of the European Society of Cardiology on Saturday and published in the New England Journal of Medicine with a glowing editorial. Investigators working on the study and the company itself believe it has potential to replace drugs that have been central to treating heart failure for a quarter of century, opening up a multi-billion dollar sales opportunity.



Tests show no sign of Ebola in Swedish man
 

Protective gear of Czech military personnel wearing protective gear hang on hooks in the Biological Defence Centre in the village of TechoninMedical authorities in the Swedish capital said on Monday tests on a man brought into hospital over the weekend and suspected of potentially carrying Ebola showed no signs the deadly disease. The Swedish man, whose name was not disclosed, had recently traveled to a "risk area" for the virus and had been taken to the Karolinska University Hospital in Stockholm suffering from a fever, sparking suspicions of Ebola. Stockholm county council said in a statement the man would continue to be treated at the hospital to ascertain the cause of his symptoms. More than 1,500 people have died in an Ebola outbreak in West Africa since March.



India's Cipla launches copy of GSK's top asthma drug in Germany, Sweden
 India's Cipla Ltd has launched an anti-asthma inhaler in Germany and Sweden that is a generic version of GlaxoSmithKline Plc's Advair, a move that will further dent sales of the British firm's top-selling product. Cipla's drug will be marketed under the name Serrofloin in Germany and Salmeterol/Fluticasone Cipla in Sweden, the Mumbai-based company said in a statement on Monday. In December, Denmark became the first European country to approve for sale a generic version of GlaxoSmithKline's $8 billion-a-year Advair, and analysts have been expecting more such approvals.

Nigeria records another Ebola case in oil city, 16 cases in total
 Nigeria has a third confirmed case of Ebola disease in the oil hub of Port Harcourt, bringing the country's total confirmed infections to 16, with around 200 people under surveillance, the health minister said on Monday. A doctor in Port Harcourt died last week after treating a contact of the Liberian-American man who was the first recorded case of the virus in Africa's most populous country. Patrick Sawyer, the first case, came in from Liberia, then collapsed at Lagos airport on July 20. The shift to Port Harcourt shows how easily containment efforts can be undermined.

Pistachios may help reduce diabetes risk: study
 

Pistachios are seen after sorting at a processing factory in RafsanjanBy Kathryn Doyle NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - For people who may be headed for type 2 diabetes, regularly eating pistachios might help turn the tide, according to a new trial from Spain. People with so-called prediabetes have blood sugar levels higher than normal but not yet in the diabetes range. If they do nothing, 15 to 30 percent will develop diabetes within five years, according to the U.S. In the new Spanish study, people with prediabetes who ate about two ounces of pistachios daily showed significant drops in blood sugar and insulin levels and improvements in insulin and glucose processing.



Exercise to reap the heart-health benefits of wine, study says
 

Exercise to reap the heart-health benefits of wine, study saysAt the European Society of Cardiology Congress, researchers from the Czech Republic presented a first of its kind study in which they concluded that wine has its greatest cardiovascular benefits for those who exercise. "This is the first randomised trial comparing the effects of red and white wine on markers of atherosclerosis in people at mild to moderate risk of CVD," says Professor Milos Taborsky, Director of the Internal Cardiology Clinic of the University Hospital and Palacky University in Olomouc. "We found that moderate wine drinking was only protective in people who exercised. Red and white wine produced the same results."



Ebola health workers should get danger money, expert says
 

Health workers wearing protective clothing prepare themselves before to carrying an abandoned dead body presenting with Ebola symptoms at Duwala market in MonroviaBy Misha Hussain DAKAR (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Doctors and nurses fighting the world's biggest outbreak of the Ebola virus in West Africa should get incentives including better pay, insurance and access to the new Ebola drug ZMapp, an international health expert said. The hemorrhagic fever, spread through the blood, sweat and vomit of the sick, has killed more than 1,550 people since March, including more than 120 health workers. Johan von Schreeb, who has traveled to the region to advise officials on how to manage the deadly epidemic, said if health workers were not protected and remunerated for their dangerous work, they could not be expected to report for duty. "Modern mobile phone technology can be used to track who is coming to work as well as transferring money directly so they can be paid on a performance-based system on top of their normal salaries," he told Thomson Reuters Foundation from Sierra Leone, where he is providing technical support for the outbreak.



Drama of mother starving baby grips Venice fest
 

Director Saverio Costanzo and cast member Alba Rohrwacher attend the red carpet for the movie "Hungry Hearts" at the 71st Venice Film FestivalBy Michael Roddy VENICE (Reuters) - A film portraying New York City mother who starves her baby because she thinks he is saint-like and food contains impurities has caused a stir at the Venice Film Festival for its switch from light romance to painful psychosis. "Hungry Hearts", by Italian director Saverio Costanzo, is one of two Italian films shown so far this week that are among 20 films competing for the top Golden Lion award at the world's oldest film festival. It stars Adam Driver, who will be in the next "Star Wars" series, and Italian actress Alba Rohrwacher as his wife. The film, which was shot for a budget of under 1 million euros ($1.3 million), starts off in rom-com style when Driver's character Jude, who works as an engineer, and Rohrwacher's Mina, who works at the Italian embassy, are both accidentally locked in the toilet of a Chinese restaurant.



Tea drinkers may have better general health, study says
 

Tea drinkers may have better general health, study saysA new study reveals that drinking tea could reduce non-cardiovascular mortality by 24 percent, possibly thanks to a combination of tea's antioxidant content and the other healthy lifestyle habits that tea drinkers often maintain. "If you have to choose between tea or coffee it's probably better to drink tea," says Professor Nicholas Danchin of the cardiology unit at the Georges Pompidou Hospital in Paris, who presented the study at the European Society of Cardiology Congress. Data revealed that coffee drinkers were at greater risk for CV, especially if they smoked. Curiously, the percentage of smokers increased with amount of coffee consumption.



Pricing is key for new heart drugs challenging cheap generics
 

People walk past a chemist shop at a market in MumbaiWhile new treatments on show in Barcelona are certainly moving cardiovascular medicine forward after a series of setbacks in recent years, cardiologists say that cost will be key in determining how widely they are used. “We are entering a new era of treatment and, of course, it will cost a lot of money, which is a problem,” said Michel Bertrand, emeritus professor at the University of Lille and a past president of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). Hopes have spiked for a heart failure drug from Novartis and an innovative class of injectable anti-cholesterol agents known as PCSK9 inhibitors after the release of data at the ESC's annual meeting indicated that they can save more lives than standard therapies. Novartis's new heart failure drug LCZ696, for example, was tested in a pivotal trial against enalapril, a generic drug in the so-called ACE inhibitor class, a month's supply of which can be bought at Wal-Mart stores for only $4.



Parents of seriously ill British boy resist extradition from Spain
 

A Spanish National Police officer stands beside a Civil Guard's van that Naghemeh and Brett, parents of seriously ill Ashya King, 5, left in, at the Spanish High Court in MadridThe British parents who sparked a major manhunt by taking their seriously ill son out of hospital last week have asked a Spanish court not to extradite them to the United Kingdom, a judicial source said on Monday. Brett and Naghemeh King are wanted in the United Kingdom after removing their son Ashya, 5, who is suffering from a brain tumour, from Southampton General Hospital in southern England on Thursday, raising fears his life could be at risk. "They have said they don't want to be handed over to the British authorities," the source told Reuters. A panel of three judges will now have to decide whether to extradite the parents to the United Kingdom from Madrid, a process which could take weeks, said the source.



Human Trial for Ebola Vaccine to Begin This Week
 

Human Trial for Ebola Vaccine to Begin This WeekGlaxoSmithKline Makes Vaccine Stockpiles



Senegal monitors contacts of 1st Ebola patient
 

In this photo taken on Friday, Aug. 29, 2014, a security guard, center left, working at the University Hospital Fann, speaks to people inside a car, as a man is treated for symptoms of the Ebola virus inside the Hospital in Dakar, Senegal. The effort to contain Ebola in Senegal is “a top priority emergency,” the World Health Organization said Sunday, as the government continued tracing everyone who came in contact with a Guinean student who has tested positive for the deadly disease in the capital, Dakar. (AP Photo/Jane Hahn)DAKAR, Senegal (AP) — Senegalese authorities on Monday were monitoring everyone who was in contact with a student infected with Ebola who crossed into the country, and who has lost three family members to the disease.



Novartis Japan admits concealing drug side effects
 

Swiss pharmaceuticals giant Novartis headquarter building is pictured on January 28, 2009 in BaselThe Japanese unit of Swiss pharma giant Novartis has admitted it did not report more than 2,500 cases of serious side effects in patients using its leukaemia and other cancer drugs, reportedly including some fatalities. The revelations, which marked the latest in a string of scandals at the company's Japanese subsidiary, come after local authorities slapped the firm on the wrist, saying it had to clean up its operations. On Friday, Novartis issued a statement saying it had failed to report to regulators at least 2,579 cases where patients had suffered serious potential side effects from its drugs. Japanese media said the number of cases involved could rise as Novartis probes 6,000 other cases.



Parents of ill UK boy fight extradition from Spain
 

Ashya King parents's lawyer, Juan Isidro Fernandez Diaz, arrives at the National court in Madrid, Spain, Monday, Sept. 1, 2014. A critically-ill 5-year-old boy driven to Spain by his parents, Brett and Naghemeh, against doctors' advice is receiving medical treatment for a brain tumor in a Spanish hospital as his parents await extradition to Britain, police said Sunday. Officers received a phone call late Saturday from a hotel east of Malaga advising that a vehicle fitting the description circulated by police was on its premises. Both parents were arrested and the boy, Ashya King, was taken to a hospital, a Spanish police spokesman said. (AP Photo/Andres Kudacki)LONDON (AP) — The parents of a child suffering from a severe brain tumor signaled Monday they would defy efforts to force them to return to Britain, days after their family fled to seek a novel kind of radiation treatment for the 5-year-old boy.



US eating habits improve a bit _ except among poor
 

FOR RELEASE MONDAY, SEPT. 1, 2014, AT 4 P.M.- FILE - In this April 24, 2014 file photo, a variety of healthy fruits and vegetables are displayed for sale at a market in Washington. A 12-year study released Monday, Sept. 1, 2014, shows a steady improvement in American's eating habits, but food choices remain less than ideal. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)CHICAGO (AP) — Americans' eating habits have improved — except among the poor, evidence of a widening wealth gap when it comes to diet. Yet even among wealthier adults, food choices remain far from ideal, a 12-year study found.



Action-packed TV might make you snack more: Study
 CHICAGO (AP) — Could action-packed TV fare make you fat? That's the implication of a new study that found people snacked more watching fast-paced television than viewing a more leisurely-paced talk show.

High-action TV shows lead to more snacking: study
 By Kathryn Doyle NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – Watching high-energy TV programs might make watching calories harder, a new study suggests. With snacks freely available, young adults watching an action movie ate almost twice as much food as those watching an interview show, the researchers found. Those watching the action movie ate more even if the sound was turned off. “What we found was that even watching the silent film generated a large increase in what people ate compared to the talk show,” said coauthor Aner Tal at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York.

Family dinners may help kids cope with cyberbullying
 By Kathryn Doyle NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – Like victims of face-to-face bullying, kids who experience internet bullying are vulnerable to mental health and substance use problems – but spending more time communicating with their parents may help protect them from these harmful consequences, a new study suggests. For example, the researchers found, regular family dinners seemed to help kids cope with online bullying. “In a way, cyberbullying is more insidious because it’s so hard to detect,” said lead author Frank J. Elgar of the Institute for Health and Social Policy at McGill University in Montreal.

Low-carb diets may beat low-fat options for weight loss, heart health
 By Andrew M. Seaman A low-carbohydrate diet is better for losing weight and may also be better for lowering the risk of heart disease than a low-fat diet, according to a new study. While low-carb diets have outperformed other diets when it comes to weight loss, some researchers feared they might be worse for heart health because they tend to be high in fat. The new study shows that with proper nutritional counseling, people can lose more weight and lower their risk factors for heart disease on a low-carbohydrate diet, said the lead author, Dr. Lydia Bazzano of Tulane University in New Orleans. "This study shows if you are overweight and have cardiovascular disease risk factors and haven't had success on other diets, certainly a low-carbohydrate diet is worth a try," said Bazzano.

The Power of Aromas
 Walk through any mall in America and you might suddenly be enticed by the smell of cinnamon buns or coffee. Sell your home and often you are advised by your realtor to bake bread or cookies to encourage prospective buyers. Smells are more influential then you may realize. In these two incidents smells are used to elicit sales. They are there to...

Nurses go on strike in Ebola-hit Liberia
 

Women stop to clean their hands with sanitiser before entering the John Fitzgerald Kennedy hospital in Monrovia on September 1, 2014Nurses at Liberia's largest hospital went on strike on Monday, demanding better pay and equipment to protect them against a deadly Ebola epidemic which has killed hundreds in the west African nation. John Tugbeh, spokesman for the strikers at Monrovia's John F Kennedy hospital, said the nurses would not return to work until they are supplied with "personal protective equipment (PPEs)", the hazmat-style suits which guard against infectious diseases. "From the beginning of the Ebola outbreak we have not had any protective equipment to work with. The Ebola virus, transmitted through contact with infected bodily fluids, has killed more than 1,500 people in four countries since the start of the year -- almost 700 of them in Liberia.



16 Simple Things I Do Daily
 In no order, I do the following 16 simple things daily to improve my physical and mental health:1. Walk 10k steps. 2. Drink from a water fountain every time I see one.3. 100 sit ups. 4. Take stairs instead of elevator/escalator/moving walkway. 5. Take nutritional supplements, multivitamins and calcium. 6. Eat at least 60g of protein. ...

China poultry farm hit in new outbreak of H5N6 bird flu
 Nearly 18,000 geese died on a poultry farm in northeast China after being stricken by the H5N6 bird flu virus last month, the agriculture ministry said. As many as 20,550 geese on the farm in Harbin, the capital of Heilongjiang province, showed symptoms of avian flu and 17,790 birds died, the ministry said on its website on Monday. The ministry sealed off and sterilized the infected area, besides culling and safely disposing of almost 69,000 geese, it added. The National Avian Influenza Reference Laboratory confirmed that the geese had the H5N6 virus.

Poor response to Ebola causing needless deaths: World Bank head
 

World Bank President Jim Yong Kim addresses the U.S.-Africa Business Forum in WashingtonBy Daniel Flynn and Tim Cocks DAKAR/LAGOS (Reuters) - The world's "disastrously inadequate response" to West Africa's Ebola outbreak means many people are dying needlessly, the head of the World Bank said on Monday, as Nigeria confirmed another case of the virus. In a newspaper editorial, World Bank President Jim Yong Kim said Western healthcare facilities would easily be able to contain the disease, and urged wealthy nations to share the knowledge and resources to help African countries tackle it. "Many are dying needlessly," read the editorial, co-written by Harvard University professor Paul Farmer, with whom Kim founded Partners In Health, a charity that works for better healthcare in poorer countries. In a vivid sign of the danger posed by inadequate health provision, a man escaped from an Ebola quarantine centre in Monrovia on Monday and sent people fleeing in fear as he walked through a market in search of food, a Reuters witness said.



Nigeria records another Ebola case in oil city, 17 cases total
 Nigeria has a third confirmed case of Ebola in the oil hub of Port Harcourt, bringing the country's total confirmed infections to 17, with 271 people under surveillance, the health minister said on Monday. A doctor in Port Harcourt died last week after treating someone who came in contact of the Liberian-American man who was the first recorded case of the virus in Africa's most populous country. Patrick Sawyer, the first case, came from Liberia, and then collapsed at Lagos airport on July 20. The shift to Port Harcourt shows how easily containment efforts can be undermined.

South Korea lifts ban on beef with feed additive: food ministry
 By Meeyoung Cho SEOUL (Reuters) - South Korea has lifted a ban on the use of animal feed additive zilpaterol in beef, opening the door to imports containing the growth enhancer as well as domestic sales of the product. Seoul said last October that it intended to ease its zero-tolerance policy on zilpaterol-based drugs, such as Merck & Co Inc's Zilmax, after a risk assessment found it could be permitted at certain levels. South Korea last year suspended some U.S. An official at South Korea's food ministry confirmed on Tuesday that imports of beef muscle with 1 part per billion (ppb) of zilpaterol, 5 ppb in beef liver and 10 ppb in beef kidney had been approved as of late last month.

Novo Nordisk drops inflammatory disorder business, incurs cost
 

Insulin jabs are pictured on a production line in Novo Nordisk's plant in KalundborgDanish pharmaceutical company Novo Nordisk said on Tuesday it has decided to stop its activities within inflammatory disorders and only focus on the treatment and prevention of diabetes and obesity. The decision follows a discontinuation for the company's most advanced drug candidate within the area, a drug used to treat rheumatoid arthritis and known as anti-IL-20, announced on Aug. 7 together with its with second quarter results. "The discontinuation of anti-IL-20 delays our earliest possible entrance into the market for anti-inflammatory therapeutics to the late 2020s," Chief Science Officer Mads Krogsgaard Thomsen said in a statement. Novo Nordisk said 400 employees would be affected by the decision but that it hoped to offer other positions within the company to more than half of those.



Dengue fever strikes models in Japan
 

A worker sprays insecticide at the Yoyogi park, central Tokyo, believed to be the source of the mosquito-borne dengue fever, on August 28, 2014A worsening outbreak of dengue fever in Japan has claimed its first celebrities -- two young models sent on assignment to the Tokyo park believed to be its source. The details emerged as the government said Tuesday that at least 34 people have now caught the disease, which has not been seen in Japan for seven decades apart from cases contracted overseas. The two women -- Saaya, 20, and Eri Aoki, 25 -- were sent to Yoyogi Park last month for the Saturday variety show on which they appear, the Nikkan Sports said. The revelation that the two beauties had succumbed to the mosquito-borne disease provided fodder for the self-referencing TV shows that fill daytime schedules in celebrity-obsessed Japan.



Defeat of California initiative would protect insurers' profits
 Proposition 45 would allow California's insurance chief to block insurance rate hikes; insurers are spending millions to kill it.

Ebola threatens food security in West Africa: FAO
 

Resident of West Point neighbourhood, which has been quarantined following an outbreak of Ebola, receives food rations from the United Nations World Food Programme in MonroviaThe world's worst Ebola epidemic has put harvests at risk and sent food prices soaring in West Africa, the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) said on Tuesday, warning the problem would intensify in coming months. The FAO issued a special alert for Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea, the three countries most affected by the outbreak, which has killed around 1,550 people since the virus was detected in the remote jungles of southeastern Guinea in March. Restrictions on people's movements and the establishment of quarantine zones to contain the spread of the hemorrhagic fever has led to panic buying, food shortages and price hikes in countries ill-prepared to absorb the shock. "Even prior to the Ebola outbreak, households in some of the most affected areas were spending up to 80 percent of their incomes on food," said Vincent Martin, head of an FAO unit in Dakar which is coordinating the agency's response.



Ebola kills 31 people in DR Congo: WHO
 

Health care workers, wearing protective suits, work at the Elwa hospital in Monrovia on August 30, 2014An outbreak of the Ebola virus in the Democratic Republic of Congo has killed 31 people and the epidemic remains contained in a remote northwestern region, UN the World Health Organization (WHO) said Tuesday. "There are now 31 deaths," Eugene Kambambi, the WHO's head of communication in DR Congo, told AFP, citing Congolese authorities and stressing that the epidemic "remains contained" in an area around 800 kilometres (500 miles) north of the capital Kinshasa. Health officials had previously given a death toll of 13 people from the lethal haemorrhagic fever since August 11 around the isolated town of Boende, surrounded by dense tropical forest in Equateur province. Kabambi was speaking by telephone from Mbandaka, the provincial capital, where he was accompanied by Health Minister Felix Kabange Numbi and the WHO representative in DRC, Joseph Cabore.



Death toll from Congo Ebola outbreak rises to 31
 

Health workers wearing protective clothing prepare to carry an abandoned dead body presenting with Ebola symptoms at Duwala market in MonroviaKINSHASA (Reuters) - The death toll from an outbreak of the Ebola virus in the Djera region of northern Democratic Republic of Congo has risen to 31, Minister of Health Felix Kabange Numbi told Reuters on Tuesday. The outbreak in Congo's Equateur province is thought to be separate from an epidemic in the West African nations of Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia that has killed more than 1,550 people since March.



 
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