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5 Things People Misunderstand About Mental Strength
 

5 Things People Misunderstand About Mental StrengthDecades of research have gone into studying how people can grow stronger by changing the ways they think, feel, and behave. But there are a lot of articles on mental strength and mental toughness that just aren't accurate, so I wanted to take the opportunity to clear up some of the biggest misconceptions about mental strength.Here are five...



10 Best Sunscreens to Protect Your Skin
 Every year, the Friday before Memorial Day is National Sunscreen Day! With summer around the corner and the rising intensity of the sun, it's extremely important to use sunscreen daily to protect our skin from its dangerous ultraviolet rays. There are so many different types of sunscreens out there these days so which brands are best? After...

Corrected: U.S. sees first case of bacteria resistant to last-resort antibiotic
 

10068U.S. health officials on Thursday reported the first case in the country of a patient with an infection resistant to a last-resort antibiotic, and expressed grave concern that the superbug could pose serious danger for routine infections if it spreads. "We risk being in a post-antibiotic world," said Thomas Frieden, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, referring to the urinary tract infection of a 49-year-old Pennsylvania woman who had not traveled within the prior five months. Frieden, speaking at a National Press Club luncheon in Washington, D.C., said the bacteria was resistant to colistin, an antibiotic that is reserved for use against "nightmare bacteria." The infection was reported Thursday in a study appearing in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, a publication of the American Society for Microbiology.



Healthcare costs nosedive when smokers quit
 By Ronnie Cohen (Reuters Health) - When cigarette smokers quit, societal healthcare costs immediately plunge, a new study shows. If 10 percent of American smokers gave up cigarettes and the rest cut back by 10 percent, the U.S. could shave $63 billion off medical costs the next year, the analysis found. "You start to see the benefits quickly, and they're huge because healthcare costs are so gigantic," study coauthor Stanton Glantz told Reuters Health.

Dr. Heimlich, 96, saves choking woman with namesake maneuver
 

Dr. Henry Heimlich poses with Patty Ris, who he saved this week from choking on a hamburger in CincinnatiHeimlich, who in multiple national television appearances had demonstrated the technique commonly known as the "Heimlich Maneuver" to dislodge food from an airway, had never employed it in an emergency, said spokesman Ken Paley. "After three compressions, this piece of meat came out, and she just started breathing, her whole face changed," Heimlich said in a video interview shared by Paley, vice president of marketing for Episcopal Retirement Services, which operates Deupree House.



How I (Try) to Filter Through the Noise and Read Effectively
 Recently, a handful of people have asked me about my method for reading. Before I get to that, some quick context: I flat-out love reading and take it seriously. My humble web of knowledge has grown from the various books and articles that I've read in the past. And the things I'll read in the future will integrate into and expand - or even...

U.N. urges Greece to improve conditions for transferred refugees
 

A refugee woman hangs clothes to dry at the sun after heavy rainfall at a makeshift camp for migrants and refugees near the village of IdomeniRefugees removed from a makeshift Greek camp near the Macedonian border have been taken to sites with "sub-standard conditions" in derelict buildings with insufficient food, water, toilets and showers, the United Nations refugee agency said on Friday. The U.N. agency, the UNHCR, said refugees removed by bus from Idomeni had received little information about conditions at the new sites and how long they would stay there. Poor conditions were compounding the already high level of distress and fuelling tensions, it said.



Medical experts urge delay or relocation of Olympics due to Zika
 More than 100 health experts have called for the Rio Olympic Games to be postponed or moved because of the threat to public health from Brazil's Zika virus outbreak, according to a public letter published online. "Our greater concern is for global health," the letter said. "The Brazilian strain of Zika virus harms health in ways that science has not observed before.

Chronic sleep deprivation tied to more depression for young women
 By Kathryn Doyle (Reuters Health) - One night of short sleep may lead to less depression the following day, but chronic short sleep is tied to greater depression overall for young women, according to a new study. “The overall message that poor quality and insufficient sleep lead to poor mood, which, in turn, worsens sleep was not surprising,” said lead author David A. Kalmbach of the University of Michigan Medical School in Ann Arbor. The researchers studied 171 female college students for two weeks, beginning with an in-person questionnaire assessment of anxiety and depression levels and continuing with daily self-reported measures of mood and anxiety.

Tighter blood pressure control may be advisable for elderly
 By Larry Hand NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - A new study might help doctors answer the controversial question of what's the healthiest blood pressure for older adults. In adults above age 75 who could walk without assistance, keeping the top blood pressure number below 120 millimeters of mercury (mmHg) led to significantly lower rates of cardiovascular events and deaths from any cause, the study found. There had been some fear that bringing the top number - called the systolic pressure - down below 120 mmHg might actually be risky for older individuals.

U.N. urges Syrian government to stop blocking aid deliveries
 

Men unload flour from a Red Crescent and United Nations aid convoy in the rebel held besieged town of Hamoria area in SyriaThe United Nations' humanitarian chief on Friday demanded that the Syrian government and militant groups stop interfering with the delivery of food and medicine for civilians trapped in besieged and difficult-to-reach areas in war-ravaged Syria. "The continued use of siege and starvation as a weapon of war is reprehensible," U.N. under secretary-general Stephen O'Brien told the 15-nation Security Council.   "Based on the latest information, we now estimate that some 592,700 people are currently living in besieged areas," he said, adding that most of those were surrounded by government forces. The five-year-old civil war in Syria has killed at least 250,000 people.



The Perfect Yoga Routine to Do Before Your Flight
 

May 30 Judgement Day for Americans Tortured In UAENo matter how excited you are to travel, some part of you is probably dreading the flight. One of the most unpleasant factors of air travel is sitting in a cramped seat for hours on end. A stiff neck, cramping, and sore muscles affect everyone, but that doesn't mean there's nothing you can do to prevent them. Doing yoga before your flight is a...



Scientists disagree over Zika risk at Brazil's Olympics
 

Material to prevent Zika infection by mosquitoes are displayed at the 68th World Health Assembly at the UN in GenevaOne day after a top U.S. health official declared there was no public health reason to cancel or delay this summer's Olympics in Brazil, more than 150 scientists on Friday called for just that, saying the risk of infection from the Zika virus is too high. The scientists, many of them bioethicists, who signed an open letter published online to Dr. Margaret Chan, director-general of the World Health Organization. The letter urged that the Games, due to be held in Rio de Janeiro in August, be moved to another location or delayed.



Health experts urge WHO to consider moving Rio Olympics
 

FILE - In this Tuesday, Jan. 26, 2016 file photo, health workers get ready to spray insecticide to combat the Aedes aegypti mosquitoes that transmits the Zika virus, under the bleachers of the Sambadrome in Rio de Janeiro, which will be used for the Archery competition in the 2016 summer games. More than 145 public health experts signed an open letter to the World Health Organization on Friday, May 27, 2016 asking the U.N. health agency to consider whether the Rio de Janeiro Olympics should be postponed or moved because of the ongoing Zika outbreak. The letter calls for the games to be delayed or relocated “in the name of public health.” (AP Photo/Leo Correa, File)LONDON (AP) — Health experts on Friday urged the World Health Organization to consider whether the Rio de Janeiro Olympics should be postponed or moved because of the Zika outbreak.



Dr. Heimlich, 96, uses his maneuver to save choking woman
 

Dr. Heimlich, 96, uses his maneuver to save choking womanCINCINNATI (AP) — The 96-year-old retired chest surgeon credited with developing the namesake Heimlich maneuver has used it to save a woman choking on food at his senior living center.



California rushes to allow HIV-infected organ transplants
 

Dr. Peter Stock poses for photos on the University of California, San Francisco Medical Center campus in San Francisco, Friday, May 27, 2016. California lawmakers approved emergency legislation Friday to allow a man with HIV to receive part of his HIV-positive husband's liver before the surgery becomes too dangerous, possibly within weeks. The UCSF Medical Center is one of four U.S. hospitals authorized to transplant HIV-infected organs. Transplant surgeon Dr. Stock says he hopes to perform the operation quickly, but he will need time to do tests and preparation on the patients. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California lawmakers approved emergency legislation Friday to allow a man with HIV to receive part of his HIV-positive husband's liver before the surgery becomes too dangerous, possibly within weeks.



Biogen, AbbVie once-monthly MS injection wins U.S. approval
 (Reuters) - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Friday approved a once-monthly injection for multiple sclerosis from Biogen Inc and AbbVie Inc, with a boxed warning. The self-administered, under-the-skin injection, Zinbryta, is designed to treat adults with relapsing forms of the disease. Zinbryta should generally be used in patients who have not benefited from at least two prior therapies as the drug poses serious safety risks, the FDA said.

Cellphone radiation study raises concerns despite low risk
 

FILE - This Wednesday, Feb. 19, 2014 file photo shows a display of cell phones during a Federal Trade Commission (FTC) mobile tracking demo in Washington. On Friday, May 27, 2016, National Institutes of Health expert reviewers said they are finding flaws in the agency's new study that connects heavy cellphone radiation to a slight increase in brain tumors in male rats. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)WASHINGTON (AP) — A new federal study of the potential dangers of cellphone radiation, conducted in rats, found a slight increase in brain tumors in males and raised long-dormant concerns about the safety of spending so much time with cellphones glued to our ears.



U.S. sees first case of bacteria resistant to last-resort antibiotic
 

10068U.S. health officials on Thursday reported the first case in the country of a patient with an infection resistant to a last-resort antibiotic, and expressed grave concern that the superbug could pose serious danger for routine infections if it spreads. "We risk being in a post-antibiotic world," said Thomas Frieden, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, referring to the urinary tract infection of a 49-year-old Pennsylvania woman who had not traveled within the prior five months. Frieden, speaking at a National Press Club luncheon in Washington, D.C., said the bacteria was resistant to colistin, an antibiotic that is reserved for use against "nightmare bacteria." The infection was reported Thursday in a study appearing in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, a publication of the American Society for Microbiology.



Portland schools failed protocols over high lead levels in water
 By Brendan O'Brien (Reuters) - Portland Public Schools failed to follow federal protocols and did not notify parents after high levels of lead were detected at two of its schools two months ago, the district said on Friday. Levels of lead, a toxic substance that can damage the nervous system, exceeding the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum were found in 14 fountains and sinks at Creston and Rose City Park in March, according to a statement released by the district on Friday. In an email to parents and staff on Friday, the Portland Public Schools said that it failed to follow EPA protocols when it kept the fountains and sinks supplied with water while it worked to replace and retest many of the fixtures.

Delay or move Rio Olympics due to Zika - medical experts
 

Logos of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games and Rio 2016 Paralympic Games are pictured next to a message on a screen that reads "Message about Zika" during a media briefing in Rio de JaneiroMore than 100 health experts have called for the Rio Olympic Games to be postponed or moved because of fears that the event could speed up the spread of the Zika virus around the world, according to a public letter published online. "The Brazilian strain of Zika virus harms health in ways that science has not observed before," the letter said. "An unnecessary risk is posed when 500,000 foreign tourists from all countries attend the Games, potentially acquire that strain, and return home to places where it can become endemic." The letter was signed by 150 people identified as health experts and sent to the head of the World Health Organization.



Medical experts want Rio Olympics delayed or moved due to Zika
 

Material to prevent Zika infection by mosquitoes are displayed at the 68th World Health Assembly at the UN in GenevaLONDON/WASHINGTON (Reuters) - More than 100 medical experts, academia and scientists on Friday have called for the Rio Olympic Games to be postponed or moved because of fears that the event could speed up the spread of the Zika virus around the world. On Thursday, Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, declared there was no public health reason to cancel or delay this summer's Games. In a public letter posted online, the group of 150 leading public health experts, many of them bioethicists, said the risk of infection from the Zika virus is too high.



Pakistan bans airing of 'undesired' contraceptive advertisements
 By Asad Hashim ISLAMABAD (Reuters) - Pakistan has banned advertisements for contraceptive products on television and radio over concern that they expose inquisitive children to the subject of sex, local media reported on Saturday. The Pakistan Electronic Media Regulatory Authority (PEMRA) said it was acting in response to complaints from parents and its ban covered all contraceptive, birth control and family planning products. The ban came despite a government initiative to encourage birth control in Pakistan, a conservative Muslim country of 190 million people where talking about sex in public is taboo.

Sleep Revolution in the Summertime
 

May 30 Judgement Day for Americans Tortured In UAEImage of me showing off my Somni face mask from my Sleep Revolution gift bag. Photo by Milton Dimas. After a stressful school year, all college students want to come home and relax. I know; I am no different. Since being home I've admittedly watched hours of TV, and binged on Buzzfeed or Tasty videos late into the night. Without all the...



WHO rejects call for Olympics to be moved due to Zika
 

A worker from a public cleaning company wears a T-shirt that reads "Out Zika" is pictured before the inauguration ceremony of the common areas and the Live Site at the 2016 Rio Olympics park in Rio de JaneiroBy Kate Kelland and Health and Science Correspondent LONDON, (Reuters) - The World Health Organization (WHO) on Saturday rejected a call for the Rio Olympic Games to be moved or postponed due to the threat posed by a large outbreak of Zika virus in Brazil. "Based on the current assessment of Zika virus circulating in almost 60 countries globally and 39 in the Americas, there is no public health justification for postponing or cancelling the games," the WHO said in a statement. In a public letter posted online on Friday, around 150 leading public health experts, many of them bioethicists, said the risk of infection from the Zika virus was too high for the Games to go ahead safely.



Eleven people struck by lightning in Paris, six seriously hurt
 Eleven people were struck by a bolt of lightning in a park in Paris on Saturday and six of them were seriously hurt, the French interior ministry said. Eric Moulin, a spokesman for the French fire-fighting service, said the situation would have been worse if an off-duty fire officer had not been at hand to quickly provide first aid.

Honolulu schools to let kids with lice stay in class
 HONOLULU (AP) — Honolulu students who get lice next year can stay in schools that are included in a new education department policy.

UN health agency rejects call to postpone Rio Olympics
 

FILE - In this Tuesday, Jan. 26, 2016 file photo, health workers get ready to spray insecticide to combat the Aedes aegypti mosquitoes that transmits the Zika virus, under the bleachers of the Sambadrome in Rio de Janeiro, which will be used for the Archery competition in the 2016 summer games. More than 145 public health experts signed an open letter to the World Health Organization on Friday, May 27, 2016 asking the U.N. health agency to consider whether the Rio de Janeiro Olympics should be postponed or moved because of the ongoing Zika outbreak. The letter calls for the games to be delayed or relocated “in the name of public health.” (AP Photo/Leo Correa, File)BERLIN (AP) — The World Health Organization on Saturday rejected a call from 150 health experts to consider postponing or moving the Rio Summer Olympics due to the Zika virus in hard-hit Brazil, arguing that the shift would make no significant difference to the spread of the virus.



Lightning hits children's soccer match in Germany, 3 injured
 BERLIN (AP) — More than 30 people were taken to the hospital after lightning struck Saturday at the end of a children's soccer match in western Germany, police said.

The Latest: Child on life support after lightning strike
 

A fire truck is parked at the entrance to Monceau parc in the center of Paris, France, Saturday, May 28, 2016, after a lightning bolt crashed down onto a Paris park, striking 11 people at a child's birthday party. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)PARIS (AP) — The Latest on the lightning strike that struck 11 people at a park in Paris. (all times local):



Tennis-Djokovic urges wider concern over Zika
 By Pritha Sarkar PARIS, May 28 (Reuters) - Novak Djokovic urged people to think about Brazilians who are having to live with the Zika outbreak on a daily basis rather than worrying about how the situation might affect those travelling to the country for the Rio Olympics in August. The World Health Organization (WHO) rejected a call on Saturday to move or postpone the Aug. 5-21 Rio Games over the outbreak after more than 100 leading scientists said new findings about Zika made it unethical for the Games to go ahead. The United Nations health agency said having the Games in Rio as planned would "not significantly alter" the spread of Zika, which is linked to serious birth defects.

Djokovic urges wider concern over Zika
 By Pritha Sarkar PARIS (Reuters) - Novak Djokovic urged people to think about Brazilians who are having to live with the Zika outbreak on a daily basis rather than worrying about how the situation might affect those traveling to the country for the Rio Olympics in August. The World Health Organization (WHO) rejected a call on Saturday to move or postpone the Aug. 5-21 Rio Games over the outbreak after more than 100 leading scientists said new findings about Zika made it unethical for the Games to go ahead. The United Nations health agency said having the Games in Rio as planned would "not significantly alter" the spread of Zika, which is linked to serious birth defects.

Canada's Trudeau defends assisted suicide bill as deadline nears
 

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau attends their joint news conference with his Japanese counterpart Shinzo Abe at Abe's official residence in Tokyo, JapanBy Rod Nickel WINNIPEG, Manitoba (Reuters) - A bill legalizing medically-assisted suicide in Canada strikes the right balance between defending fundamental freedoms and protecting against abuses, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said on Saturday, predicting confusion if it is not approved. The draft legislation, introduced by Trudeau's Liberal government in April, would allow people with incurable illnesses or disabilities to end their lives with a medical professional's help, but stopped short of extending the right to minors and the mentally ill. "There are people who think we should have gone further with this bill, there are people who think we already went too far," Trudeau told reporters at a Liberal convention in Winnipeg.



Flint, Michigan, pipe-replacement cost nearly doubles: newspaper
 

A sign which reads ' Don Not Drink Until Further Notices' next to a water dispenser at North Western high school in Flint, a city struggling with the effects of lead-poisoned drinking water, in Michigan(Reuters) - The cost of replacing water lines in Flint, Michigan, has nearly doubled amid a health crisis from high lead levels in drinking water, the Detroit Free Press reported on Saturday. The average cost for replacing a service water line in Flint through a pilot project that ended this month was $7,500, the newspaper said. The figure is almost twice the $4,000 estimated by the state Department of Environmental Quality at the beginning of Flint's water crisis last fall.



Child still critical after lightning hits 11 in Paris park
 

A child's glasses and a jacket lie on a rock in the Park Monceau, after a lightning strike in Paris, Saturday, May 28, 2016. A Paris fire service spokesman says 11 people including eight children have been hit by lightning in a Paris park after a sudden spring storm overtook a child's birthday party. The victims had sought shelter Saturday under a tree at Park Monceau, a popular weekend hangout for well-to-do families in Paris. (AP Photo/Mstyslav Chernov)PARIS (AP) — Eight children and three adults were struck by lightning Saturday in a Paris park after a sudden spring storm sent a bolt crashing down upon a children's birthday party, a spokesman for Paris' fire service said. He credited an off-duty firefighter with playing a critical role in getting immediate medical help to the victims, but one child remains in critical condition.



WHO rejects calls to move Olympics over Zika fears
 

An open letter addressed to the WHO by international doctors, scientists and researchers said holding the Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, the second worst Zika virus affected city in Brazil, would be "irresponsible" and "unethical"The World Health Organization has ruled out any change in timing or the location of the upcoming Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, shunning a call by doctors and scientists to shift the event over the Zika virus. An open letter addressed to the global health body signed by 150 international doctors, scientists and researchers Friday had called for the August Games to be moved or delayed to help prevent the spread of Zika virus. Holding the Games in Rio, the second worst affected city in Brazil, would be "irresponsible" and "unethical" and could risk spreading the virus to "poor, as-yet unaffected places" like Africa and South Asia, said the letter.



Finally allowed 2nd child, older Chinese parents turn to IVF
 

In this Sunday, April 24, 2016 photo, Dr. Liu Jiaen, center, watches his staff member work on a laboratory dish during an infertility treatment through in vitro fertilization (IVF) for a patient at a hospital in Beijing. China’s decision to allow all married couples to have two children is driving a surge in demand for fertility treatment among older women, putting heavy pressure on clinics and breaking down past sensitivities, and even shame, about the issue. The rise in IVF points to the deferred dreams of many parents who long wanted a second child, but were prevented by a strict population control policy in place for more than 30 years. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)BEIJING (AP) — China's decision to allow all married couples to have two children is driving a surge in demand for fertility treatment among older women, putting heavy pressure on clinics and breaking down past sensitivities, and even shame, about the issue.



New incentives needed to develop antibiotics to fight superbugs
 

10068By Bill Berkrot NEW YORK (Reuters) - Drugmakers are renewing efforts to develop medicines to fight emerging antibiotic-resistant bacteria, but creating new classes of drugs on the scale needed is unlikely to happen without new financial incentives to make the effort worth the investment, companies and industry experts said. "The return on investment based on the current commercial model is not really commensurate with the amount of effort you have to put into it," said David Payne, who heads GlaxoSmithKline PLC's antibiotics drug group. Other pharmaceutical companies expressed a similar sentiment.



The Best Commencement Speech The Class Of 2016 Could Hear
 Class of 2016,Congratulations! And welcome to the rest of your historically long lives. It's worth reflecting on a semantic point for a moment: there's a reason this is called a "commencement address." The word commencement means the beginning, not the end. Never before has this been more poignant than it is today. So, here you sit, adorned in...

Child in critical condition after Paris lightning strike
 

A child's glasses and a jacket lie on a rock in the Park Monceau, after a lightning strike in Paris, Saturday, May 28, 2016. A Paris fire service spokesman says 11 people including eight children have been hit by lightning in a Paris park after a sudden spring storm overtook a child's birthday party. The victims had sought shelter Saturday under a tree at Park Monceau, a popular weekend hangout for well-to-do families in Paris. (AP Photo/Mstyslav Chernov)PARIS (AP) — A child remains in critical condition after a lightning bolt disrupted a birthday party in a Paris park, injuring several.



 
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