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4 All-Natural Supermodel Beauty Tips to Avoid
 

4 All-Natural Supermodel Beauty Tips to AvoidThis post started out very differently, but I had a realization about halfway through that it's not really in anyone's best interest for me to tear down individual celebrities for the ignorance tied to their names.For one thing, it's a disturbingly tiny world, and given the brilliance and ambition of some of my friends and colleagues, I might...



Back to School for the Soul
 

Back to School for the SoulI like to think of the year as having three major emotional phases of newness. One is the "renew"; the celebration of the New Year, an exciting time where we set goals and are eager to make this year better than the last. This is followed by the "refresh" of spring, where we come out of our winter slumps and are revived by the beautiful weather...



U.S. needs better end-of-life care, which might cut costs: study
 

An elderly couple looks out at the ocean as they sit on a park bench in La Jolla, CaliforniaBy Ian Simpson WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The United States needs to improve its medical care for people nearing death, a move that might cut rising healthcare costs, an Institute of Medicine (IOM) study said on Wednesday. The 507-page "Dying in America" study is aimed at opening a debate on how the U.S. healthcare system treats Americans nearing death and urges comprehensive care to improve the quality of life in their final days. ...



Liberian Refugee Befriends Family of Ebola-Infected Doctor
 As an American doctor recovers from Ebola at a Nebraska hospital, a Liberian refugee who works at the hospital has tried to provide extra comfort to the doctor???s family.

Sustainable Self-Soothing Technique #1
 

Sustainable Self-Soothing Technique #1The Power of Silence and Subtlety It has been a while since my first post. There have been many changes in the last couple months. I began a new job; I am moving into a new apartment; I am putting together a proposal for a book and a radio show; a friend passed away; I went on my first blind date; my gym membership expired; sessions with my...



Study asks whether artificial sweeteners may drive diabetes
 

A person receives a test for diabetes during Care Harbor LA free medical clinic in Los AngelesBy Kate Kelland LONDON, Sept 17 (Reuters) - Scientists studying the effects of artificial sweeteners in mice and humans say they have found that eating them may increase the risk of developing glucose intolerance, a risk factor for diabetes. In work that raises questions over whether artificial sweeteners - widely seen as "healthier" than sugars - should be reassessed, the researchers said the substances altered the balance of microbes in the gut linked to susceptibility to metabolic diseases like diabetes. "In our studies we found that artificial sweeteners may drive, or contribute to... ...



Why Every Runner Needs a Coach
 

Why Every Runner Needs a CoachWE ALL NEED A COACHI didn't know I needed a coach until I spoke to Andrew Kastor on the phone last Thursday. Kastor is the head coach for the ASICS Mammoth Track Club and the LA Road Runners. His wife, Deena, is an Olympic marathon bronze medalist and American record holder in the marathon and half-marathon. So, what's a guy like me doing,...



Study: Artificial Sweeteners may promote diabetes
 

Artificial sweeteners are displayed, on Wednesday, Sept. 17, 2014, in New York. Artificial sweeteners may set the stage for diabetes in some people by hampering the way their bodies handle sugar, according to results of a study released Wednesday by the journal Nature. (AP Photo/Jenny Kane)NEW YORK (AP) — Using artificial sweeteners may set the stage for diabetes in some people by hampering the way their bodies handle sugar, suggests a preliminary study done mostly in mice.



IMF proposes $127 million for three Ebola-hit countries in West Africa
 WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone could receive an additional $127 million from the International Monetary Fund to help them deal with the worst-ever outbreak of the Ebola virus, the IMF said on Wednesday. The funds, which must still be approved by the IMF's executive board, would help cover an estimated $300 million financing gap in the West African countries over the next six to nine months, when the IMF expects the impact of the outbreak to be most acute. ...

West African powerhouse Ivory Coast battles to keep out Ebola
 By Joe Bavier ABIDJAN (Reuters) - The billboard depicts a masked health worker in a biohazard suit looming over a bed-ridden patient. Above them, bright red letters warn commuters on a busy Abidjan street that "The Ebola risk is always there". As Ivory Coast campaigns to fend off an Ebola outbreak ravaging neighboring West African states, such grim reminders of the catastrophe unfolding across its western border are everywhere. ...

Study: Americans endure unwanted care near death
 WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. (AP) — Americans suffer needless discomfort and undergo unwanted and costly care as they die, in part because of a medical system ruled by "perverse incentives" for aggressive care and not enough conversation about what people want, according to a report released Wednesday.

Salt and smoking may interact to raise rheumatoid arthritis risk
 By Shereen Lehman NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Eating a diet high in salt may increase the risk of rheumatoid arthritis among smokers, according to a large study from Sweden. Researchers set out to see if a salty diet might be linked to the onset of RA, but found a connection only among smokers – who were more than twice as likely as anyone with a low-salt diet to develop the condition. “Although we could not confirm our original hypothesis, we were surprised by the large influence of sodium intake on smoking as a risk factor,” Björn Sundström told Reuters Health in an email. ...

Taiwan to raise fines and rewards over 'gutter oil' scandal
 

A customer eats lunch at a restaurant in the central district of Hong Kong on September 8, 2014Taipei (AFP) - Taiwan's government said Wednesday it plans to increase tenfold the fines for food safety violations and offer whistle-blowers more rewards to tackle a widening "gutter oil" scandal.



Syria opposition to probe measles vaccine deaths
 

A Syrian refugee child receives a vaccination on April 11, 2014 at a refugee camp near the Lebanese village of Zahle in the Bekaa valleyBeirut (AFP) - Syria's opposition said Wednesday it had launched an investigation into the deaths of 15 children inoculated against measles in the northwestern province of Idlib.



Liberia president praises U.S. for Ebola help pledge
 

Health workers in protective gear move the body of a person that they suspect dyed form the Ebola virus in Monrovia, Liberia, Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2014. The number of Ebola cases in West Africa could start doubling every three weeks and it could end up costing nearly $1 billion to contain the crisis, the World Health Organization warned Tuesday. (AP Photo/Abbas Dulleh)People critically ill with Ebola languishing in an ambulance for hours as paramedics seek a place for them. Treatment centers filling up as soon as they are opened. The situation is so dire in Liberia that its president welcomed a U.S. pledge to send troops and treatment centers, but said much more needs to be done.



U.S. scientist: Ebola unlikely to become airborne
 

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, testifies before the House Foreign Affairs subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights, and International Organizations hearing on the Ebola virus on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Sept. 17, 2014. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)A top government scientist says it's very unlikely that Ebola would mutate to spread through the air.



It's a burn-and-earn partnership for Adidas miCoach and MyFitnessPal
 

Adidas miCoachNow you can play doubles in a different way: After practicing your backhand to the digitalized coaching advice from the likes of tennis superstar Andy Murray, the best of My Fitness Pal will analyze your workout to tell you whether you've earned a cupcake.



Officials warn of potentially toxic algae on major Portland river
 By Courtney Sherwood PORTLAND Ore. (Reuters) - Public health officials in Oregon warned recreational boaters and swimmers who on warm days flock to a river that bisects Portland to stay out of the water on Wednesday after detecting what they suspect is a potentially dangerous toxic algae. Oregon Health Authority officials said they believe the unusual film found at the Willamette River is the result of toxic blue-green algae, which is dangerous to touch, drink or inhale. Filtering the water won't make it safe, and fish from the river could be dangerous to eat. ...

French MSF volunteer contracts Ebola in Liberia
 

A female French volunteer working for Doctors Without Borders (MSF) has contracted the deadly Ebola virus while on assignment in Liberia, the charity saysParis (AFP) - A female French volunteer working for Doctors Without Borders (MSF) has contracted the deadly Ebola virus while on assignment in Liberia, the charity said Wednesday.



Mid-life migraine sufferers more likely to develop Parkinson’s : study
 By Kathryn Doyle NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - People who experience migraines with aura during middle age are more than twice as likely as those without headaches to be diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease later in life, according to a new study. Whether or not you’ve had headaches, Parkinson’s disease is still rare, lead author Ann I. Scher told Reuters Health. “This definitely should not alarm people,” said Scher, of the Uniformed Services University and the National Institute on Aging in Bethesda, Maryland. ...

18 Science-Based Reasons to Try Loving-Kindness Meditation
 Many of us have heard of meditation's benefits. We may have even tried meditation once or twice. And many of us will have found it hard and concluded that "meditation is not for me." But wait! Did you know there are many forms of meditation? There are mantra meditations, visualization meditations, open-focus meditations, breath-based...

How to Be Healthy By Helping Others
 

How to Be Healthy By Helping OthersIf you've ever sat through a semester of Economics 101, you've probably been faced with the question: Do we really actually care about anyone but ourselves? Or are we purely motivated by personal gain? Economists love to argue that, yes, rational human beings are entirely self-interested. In the words of the "first" economist, Adam Smith, "It...



PTSD symptoms tied to food addiction in women: study
 By Andrew M. Seaman NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Women with symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are more than twice as likely as women without the disorder to be addicted to food, according to a new study. The results don't necessarily mean that PTSD causes food addiction or vice versa, but it may help explain a link between the mental health condition triggered by traumatic events and obesity, the researchers write in JAMA Psychiatry. ...

Ultrasound as good as CT for initial diagnosis of kidney stones : study
 By Gene Emery NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Using the sound waves of an ultrasound to detect a painful kidney stone is just as effective as the X-rays of a CT scan, and exposes patients to much less harmful radiation, according to a new multicenter study. "It's actually quite surprising that ultrasound is just as good as CT scanning when you look at patient outcomes," said Dr. Rebecca Smith-Bindman of the University of California, San Francisco, chief author of the report in the New England Journal of Medicine. Dr. Charles D. Scales, Jr. ...

Ultrasounds, CT scans equal at finding kidney stones
 

A patient enters a CT scan using X-rays and a computer to create detailed images of the inside of the body and functioning organs on January 23, 2014 in Bron, near LyonWashington (AFP) - Ultrasounds are just as effective as CT scans at finding kidney stones and should be used as a first step to avoid unnecessary radiation exposure, US researchers said Wednesday.



Doctors expect Nebraska Ebola patient to recover
 

FILE - In this Sept. 10, 2014 file photo, provided by the Nebraska Medical Center, Ebola patient Dr. Richard Sacra listens to Bible verses, read to him by his wife Debbie Sacra, via a video link . Doctors treating Sacra at the Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, Neb. said Wednesday, Sept. 17, 2014, that they are optimistic about his departure from the hospital and expect him to make a full recovery. (AP Photo/Nebraska Medical Center, Max Sacra, File)OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — An American aid worker infected with Ebola who's being treated in Nebraska is now expected to make a full recovery, his doctors said Wednesday.



Measles vaccination campaign halted in northern Syria after 15 children die
 By Dasha Afanasieva ISTANBUL (Reuters) - Fifteen children died after being vaccinated against measles in northern Syria, resulting in the program being halted, aid workers said on Wednesday, a tragedy likely to damage trust in health services in opposition-held areas. An investigation by a Syrian opposition group showed that a muscle relaxant, contained in similar packaging, was used instead of the dilute for the vaccine in the second round of vaccinations in Idlib province, Mohammed Saad from the healthcare directorate of the Syrian opposition's interim government said. ...

Humana CEO: New competition curbs Obamacare plan prices
 By Caroline Humer BOSTON (Reuters) - New competition between health insurers offering so-called Obamacare plans in 2015 is having an impact on the pricing of such coverage, based on a first look at proposed insurance premiums, the head of Humana Inc said on Wednesday. The state insurance exchanges offering coverage under the Affordable Care Act. President Barack Obama's landmark healthcare law will begin enrolling customers for 2015 benefits in mid-November. ...

Nutrition Policies Can Address Inequalities
 

Nutrition Policies Can Address InequalitiesRecent news coverage of a major analysis of Americans' diets over the past decade properly focused on the widening gap in healthy eating between higher-income and lower-income populations in our country. A typical headline reported: "U.S. diet improves slightly, but gap widens between rich and poor."That trend has been obvious for some time,...



FDA panel backs limiting use of testosterone replacement drugs
 By Toni Clarke (Reuters) - Testosterone replacement therapies should be reserved for men with specific medical conditions that impair function of the testicles, an advisory panel to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration concluded on Wednesday. The FDA is not obliged to follow the advice of its advisory panels but typically does so. The panel also recommended that companies be required to conduct additional studies to assess the cardiovascular risk of their products for patients with age-related low testosterone. ...

Florida city wants to ban medical marijuana smoking in public
 

Marijuana plants for sale are displayed at the medical marijuana farmers market in Los AngelesBy Barbara Liston ORLANDO Fla. (Reuters) - A southwest Florida city took steps Wednesday to ban medical marijuana users from lighting up a joint in public if an amendment legalizing the drug's limited use statewide is approved by voters in November. "Just because one person has the right to get high doesn’t mean everyone around them has to get high,” said Ben Nelson, mayor of Bonita Springs 15 miles north of Naples on Florida's west coast. The Bonita Springs city council voted to begin drawing up an ordinance to ban the drug in public places, Nelson said. ...



Bug delays Apple's HealthKit availability on iOS 8
 

Apple retail store is shown at a shopping mall in San Diego, CaliforniaBy Christina Farr and Abhirup Roy (Reuters) - Apple Inc said a bug in its HealthKit health and fitness application platform prevented its release along with the launch of its iOS 8 operating system for iPhones and iPads. HealthKit gathers data such as blood pressure and weight from various health apps on Apple devices, and can be viewed by doctors at one place. Regulated medical devices, such as glucose monitors with accompanying iPhone apps, can send information to HealthKit. ...



Toronto Mayor Rob Ford diagnosed with rare cancer
 

Toronto Mayor Ford makes his closing remarks during a mayoral debate hosted by the Canadian Tamil Congress in Scarborough(Reuters) - Toronto Mayor Rob Ford has a very rare and aggressive type of cancerous tumor in his abdomen, his doctor said on Wednesday, adding he would start chemotherapy treatment within days. Ford, who made international headlines with his admission that he smoked crack cocaine while in office, was hospitalized last week after having unbearable abdominal pains. He dropped out of the mayoral race last week. In a briefing on Wednesday, Toronto doctor Zane Cohen said the mayor had malignant liposarcoma, a type of cancerous tumor that arises in fat cells in deep soft tissue. ...



French nurse for medical charity MSF contracts Ebola in Liberia
 By John Irish and James Harding Giahyue PARIS/MONROVIA (Reuters) - A French volunteer working for Medecins Sans Frontieres in Liberia has contracted Ebola, the medical charity said on Wednesday, adding that seven local staff members have already fallen ill from the deadly virus. The volunteer, the first French national and MSF's first international staff member to catch the disease in the outbreak, was put in quarantine on Tuesday when early symptoms of the illness appeared, according to an MSF statement. ...

U.S. House passes bill to avert government shutdown, extend Export-Import bank
 By David Lawder WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. House of Representatives on Wednesday approved a stop-gap spending measure that averts an Oct. 1 government shutdown and extends the U.S. Export-Import Bank's ability to operate for another nine months. The measure, passed 319-108 with opposition evenly split between Republicans and Democrats, also contains a separately approved authorization for the Defense Department to train and arm moderate Syrian rebels to fight Islamic State militants. ...

Healthy Briton to be injected in Ebola vaccine trial
 

Dr Felicity Hartnell injects British volunteer Ruth Atkins with Ebola vaccine Chimp Adenovirus type 3 (ChAd3) at the Oxford Vaccine Group Centre for Clinical Vaccinology and Tropical Medicine (CCVTM) in Oxford on September 17, 2014London (AFP) - A healthy British volunteer became the first person to receive a new vaccine for the Ebola virus in a trial at the University of Oxford on Wednesday.



U.S. to begin Ebola hospital equipment lift to Liberia this week
 

Lindborg testifies before a House Foreign Affairs Subcommittee hearing on "global efforts to fight Ebola"? on Capitol Hill in WashingtonBy David Morgan WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The first planeload of hospital equipment in the U.S. military's battle against West Africa's deadly Ebola outbreak will arrive in Liberia on Friday, a senior administration official said on Wednesday. The United States hopes its expanded effort to contain the spread of the virus will help rally other countries in ramping up the global response to the epidemic, U.S. aid official Nancy Lindborg told a U.S. House of Representatives committee. ...



First French Ebola victim to be flown home from Liberia
 

Volunteers wearing t-shirts of the United Nations Development Programme show a placard to raise awareness about the symptoms of the Ebola virus to students in Abidjan, on September 15, 2014Paris (AFP) - The first French Ebola patient was set to be flown home Thursday, as the World Bank warned the spiralling epidemic is threatening economic catastrophe in west Africa.



GSK melanoma pill backed by UK cost watchdog with price cut
 

The logo of GlaxoSmithKline is seen on its office building in ShanghaiLONDON (Reuters) - Britain's healthcare cost agency NICE has recommended a third new drug for melanoma, this time from GlaxoSmithKline, after the drugmaker offered to supply it at a discount to the state-run National Health Service. GSK currently markets Tafinlar but the product will soon transfer to Novartis under a deal between the two companies to trade assets. Tafinlar is an oral medicine that works in a similar way to Roche's already recommended drug Zelboraf. Both target a specific gene mutation linked to around half of aggressive melanomas. ...



Spanish judge orders release of ill boy's parents
 

This is an undated handout photos issued by England's Hampshire Police on Monday Sept. 1, 2014, of Brett King and Naghemeh King, the parents of Ashya King, who have legal proceedings against them continuing in Spain after they took the five-year-old brain cancer patient out of hospital without doctors' consent. Critically-ill 5-year-old boy Ashya King driven to Spain by his parents is receiving medical treatment for a brain tumor in a Spanish hospital as his parents await extradition to Britain, police said Sunday Aug. 31 2014. Officers received a phone call late Saturday from a hotel east of Malaga advising that a vehicle fitting the description circulated by police was on its premises. Both parents were arrested and the boy, Ashya King, was taken to a hospital, a Spanish police spokesman said. (AP Photo/Hampshire Police)SOTO DEL REAL, Spain (AP) — Spanish officials have ordered the immediate release of a detained British couple who were wanted by police in the United Kingdom after they took their critically ill child for treatment abroad without doctors' consent.



 
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