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Kentucky man admits to selling fraudulent fertility kits
 A Kentucky man, who made international news for saying he was trying to clone humans, must close or sell his business after pleading guilty to a federal charge that he misled customers about in-home fertility kits, according to court documents. Panayiotis Zavos faces up to a year in prison when he is sentenced in January on the misdemeanor charge. His attorney, Jarrod J. Beck, said on Friday he hopes his client will avoid prison. Zavos and his company, Zavos Diagnostic Laboratories, Inc., or ZDL, both pleaded guilty on Thursday to a misdemeanor as part of a plea agreement.

Toronto mayor Rob Ford withdraws from race, brother steps in
 

Ford walks through a busy media scrum as he walks to his office during a break in a Capital and Operating Budgets meeting at City Hall in TorontoBy Andrea Hopkins TORONTO (Reuters) - Toronto Mayor Rob Ford, who gained global notoriety for admitting he smoked crack cocaine, dropped his re-election bid on Friday, citing a health crisis, but his older brother took his place in the race to run Canada's largest city. In drama worthy of Shakespeare, the family switch was made minutes before a deadline for changes to the city election ballot, which also saw a Ford nephew withdraw to allow his uncle, the mayor, to run for a city council seat in his place. The Oct. 27 election is seen as a referendum on Ford's four tumultuous years leading Toronto. Doug Ford, the mayor's older brother and campaign manager, is regarded as less charismatic but less volatile than his larger-than-life sibling, who steadfastly refused to resign even as he admitted buying illegal drugs while in office and checked himself into rehab.



U.S. to train Liberian armed forces to help tackle Ebola crisis
 

Security forces control a checkpoint outside the Ebola quarantine area of West Point as relatives carry food and essentials for their family members, in MonroviaBy Derick Snyder and Umaru Fofana MONROVIA/FREETOWN (Reuters) - The United States said on Friday it would train Liberia's security forces to assist in isolation operations to tackle an Ebola epidemic ravaging the West African nation, after a boy was killed when soldiers opened fire on a protest last month. The worst Ebola outbreak on record has killed more than 2,400 people in West Africa - more than half of them in Liberia. Liberian officials have called the outbreak the greatest threat to national stability since a 1989-2003 civil war. ...



AfDB offers $150 million to help West Africa handle Ebola fallout: Le Monde
 

People walk past a billboard displaying a government message about Ebola on a street in AbidjanThe African Development Bank (AfDB) told West African countries hardest hit by an Ebola epidemic they were willing to give $150 million to help balance their public finances, but they must first show they are doing everything possible to improve their health systems. Economic growth in Liberia and Sierra Leone could decline by almost 3.5 percentage points and Guinea 1 percentage point, exposing financing gaps totaling $100 million to $130 million in each of the three countries, the IMF said on Thursday. "The urgency is to stabilize public finances," AfDB chief Donald Kaberuka told Le Monde newspaper in remarks published on Saturday.



AfDB offers $150 mln to help West Africa handle Ebola fallout-Le Monde
 

President of the AFDB Donald Kaberuka speaks during the opening of a conference in TunisPARIS (Reuters) - The African Development Bank (AfDB) told West African countries hardest hit by an Ebola epidemic they were willing to give $150 million to help balance their public finances, but they must first show they are doing everything possible to improve their health systems. Economic growth in Liberia and Sierra Leone could decline by almost 3.5 percentage points and Guinea 1 percentage point, exposing financing gaps totalling $100 million to $130 million in each of the three countries, the IMF said on Thursday. ...



Anger mounts in Indian Kashmir after worst flood in over century
 

An Indian Air Force helicopter flies above flooded-affected areas of Kashmir regionBy Krista Mahr SRINAGAR India (Reuters) - Residents of revolt-torn Indian Kashmir turned their wrath on state administrators for failing to provide them with succor after the worst flooding in over a century, angrily dumping food parcels into gutters. A week into the disaster, large parts of Srinagar, the capital of Jammu and Kashmir, lay under water with many people still trapped atop their homes, and others crowded in relief camps. Their misery has added to problems of the administration in a Muslim-majority region where a revolt against Indian rule has simmered for nearly a quarter century. Nobody in our area was rescued by air.” Outside one mosque-turned-camp in Srinagar, food supplies dropped earlier in the day by a military helicopter were strewn in a gutter, rejected.     “People said we don’t need this government food,” said Nayeem, who lives in the neighborhood.



Texas governor's race heats up over new book
 

Texas Democratic gubernatorial nominee Wendy Davis talks to reporters at a news conference in AustinBy Marice Richter DALLAS (Reuters) - The race for Texas governor entered a new chapter this week with the release of a memoir from Democratic candidate Wendy Davis that rekindled attention on abortion and led to an ethics complaint from her opponent, Republican Greg Abbott. Abbott, currently the state's attorney general, is accusing Davis of misusing campaign contributions to promote the book called "Forgetting to Be Afraid," in which Davis, a state senator, reveals she had terminated two pregnancies. "Senator Davis' book promotion has gone from ethically questionable to outright unlawful," Abbott campaign spokesman Matt Hirsch said. Davis campaign spokesman Zac Petkanas called the complaint frivolous and said it shows "how worried Greg Abbott is about the power of her story." Davis, who rose from being a single mother in a trailer park to a Harvard Law school graduate, gained national standing in 2013 when she donned pink running shoes and staged a dramatic 10-hour filibuster at the Texas statehouse against sweeping abortion restrictions.



Rampant Ebola fear takes toll on Africa tourism
 

In this photo taken Wednesday, March 28, 2012, a man offering camel rides for tourists leads his animals along the Indian Ocean beach of Diani, a popular tourist destination on the coast of Kenya. Ebola is thousands of miles away from Kenya’s pristine Indian Ocean beaches but the deadly disease appears to be discouraging tourism there and elsewhere in this vast continent, with tour operators across Africa saying they face difficulties as the Ebola outbreak, which has killed more than 2,400 people in four countries, continues to defy international efforts to control it. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)KAMPALA, Uganda (AP) — Ebola is thousands of miles away from Kenya's pristine Indian Ocean beaches, but the deadly disease appears to be discouraging tourism there and elsewhere in this vast continent.



Colorado activists want rules on pot edibles implemented fast
 

Cookies shaped like marijuana leafs are pictured at the Cannabis Carnivalus 4/20 event in SeattleBy Daniel Wallis DENVER (Reuters) - (This story refiles the Sept. 11 story to correct the spelling of a surname to Carlson, not Carson, in the fifth paragraph) Activists in Colorado called on Thursday for the fast implementation of rules requiring marijuana-infused edibles be clearly distinguishable from regular products when removed from their original packaging. Colorado and Washington this year became the first U.S. states to allow recreational sales of the drug to adult, and much of the public debate has since centered on regulations for edibles such as pot cookies, chocolates and drinks. ...



Sanofi aims to grow Genzyme unit with new drugs and acquisitions
 In the 10th paragraph, the quote should be attributed to Bill Sibold, not Mike Panzara) Sanofi rare disease unit Genzyme hopes to become a leader in the multiple sclerosis (MS) field with the help of new products developed in-house but also through acquisitions, senior Genzyme executives told Reuters. The Cambridge, Massachusetts company is confident in the commercial success of its two MS drugs Lemtrada and Aubagio and is "very active" in its hunt for external growth, Bill Sibold, the head of Genzyme's MS franchise, told Reuters. He declined to comment on potential targets but said Genzyme was looking to snap up truly innovative products, was regularly talking to other companies and constantly weighing its options.

Sierra Leone requests funds for Ebola evacuation
 FREETOWN, Sierra Leone (AP) — The World Health Organization said Saturday it could not meet a request from Sierra Leone to evacuate a doctor who contracted the deadly Ebola disease.

NFL says a quarter of players will end up with brain problems
 

NFL logo appears on an entrance door to football stadium at Super Bowl XLII in Glendale(Reuters) - About one in four National Football League players are likely to end up suffering dementia, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease or other cognitive impairments during their lifetime, according to a report filed in court by the league's lawyers. The NFL submitted the summary of the findings of an actuarial study it had commissioned in the U.S. The study by the Segal Group, based in New York City, used a database of the medical history of retired players as part of its method. The report appears to be the most definitive statement the NFL has yet made on the dangers of the sometimes violent sport, where players can develop concussions as they butt helmeted heads with those of other players.



Dutch Ebola doctors 'to be evacuated on Sunday'
 

MSF medical workers put on protective clothing at an MSF Ebola treatment facility in Kailahun, on August 15, 2014Two Dutch doctors feared to have contracted the deadly Ebola virus while working in Sierra Leone are set to be flown back to the Netherlands "as soon as possible", the foreign ministry said Saturday. The healthcare workers could be back home by Sunday afternoon "if all goes well", spokesman Harald Wychgel from the Dutch Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM) told AFP. The two men are not yet showing any symptoms of the deadly virus, he added. Doctors Nick Zwinkels and Erdi Huizenga, who were working at the Lion Heart Medical Centre in the western town of Yele, "came into contact with three people who then died from the Ebola virus", according to foreign ministry spokesman Friso Wijnen.



Toronto mayor Rob Ford says God 'wants him somewhere else'
 

Ford walks through a busy media scrum as he walks to his office during a break in a Capital and Operating Budgets meeting at City Hall in TorontoToronto Mayor Rob Ford, who this week dropped out of the city's mayoral race only to be replaced by his elder brother, on Saturday said in a newspaper interview that the early diagnosis from an abdominal tumour was "not good." Ford, a larger-than-life figure who made international headlines with his admission that he smoked crack cocaine while in office, was hospitalized earlier in the week after having unbearable abdominal pains. In a dramatic turn of events, Ford dropped his bid for re-election minutes ahead of a Friday deadline, replaced by his brother and campaign manager Doug Ford. In an interview on Saturday in the Toronto Sun newspaper, Ford said he was "shocked" and "devastated," and had to quit the race to focus on his health. The Fords' politician father, Doug Ford Sr., died of colon cancer less than three months after being diagnosed in 2006.



Liberian president appeals to Obama for U.S. help to beat Ebola
 

Liberian President Johnson-Sirleaf speaks during an interview with Reuters in BrusselsBy Daniel Flynn DAKAR (Reuters) - Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf has appealed to U.S. President Barack Obama for urgent aid in tackling the worst recorded outbreak of the deadly Ebola virus, saying that without it her country would lose the fight against the disease. The outbreak, which was first discovered in March, has now killed more than 2,400 people mostly in Liberia, neighbouring Guinea and Sierra Leone, as understaffed and poorly resourced West African healthcare systems have been overrun. ...



7 Habits That Wreck Your Feet
 

7 Habits That Wreck Your FeetSPECIAL FROM Next AvenueBy Linda MeloneIf you wore a pedometer from the day you started walking, you'd have logged in more then 70,000 miles by the time you hit age 50. When you walk a good portion of those miles in improperly-fitting shoes or otherwise neglect your feet, it's little wonder why they hurt. The 38 muscles in your feet make up...



A week on from flood, 150,000 still stranded in Indian Kashmir
 

Indian army soldiers evacuate flood victims by a boat to a safer place in SrinagarBy Krista Mahr and Fayaz Bukhari SRINAGAR, India (Reuters) - About 150,000 people were still stranded in their homes a week after Indian Kashmir's worst flood in over a century and fears grew on Sunday of an outbreak of diseases from vast fields of stagnant brown water. Indian army and civilian boats trawled through the streets -now water channels - of the state capital Srinagar – picking up residents and delivering water, food and basic medicine to people who chose to remain camped out in the upper floors of their houses. The state administration, which was itself knocked out after the waters of the Jhelum river gushed into the city center, has struggled to cope with the flood, the worst in 109 years. The disaster has fueled public anger in the Muslim-majority region where a revolt against Indian rule has simmered for nearly a quarter century.



Post-war counselling awaits Gaza children going back to school
 

The empty chair of a student is seen inside a class on the first day of the new school year in the east of Gaza CityBy Nidal al-Mughrabi GAZA (Reuters) - Some 500,000 children returned on Sunday to school in the Gaza Strip, where many will be given psychological counselling before regular studies begin after a devastating 50-day war between Palestinian militants and Israel. The opening of the school year had been delayed for three weeks because of damage to more than 250 schools and the use of about 90 U.N. educational facilities as shelters for tens of thousands of residents displaced by fighting, the United Nations and local authorities said. ...



Abbott dissolving stent has lower angina rate vs metal stent: study
 Abbott's Absorb dissolving heart stent proved as safe and effective one year after being placed in a diseased artery as the company's market-leading Xience drug coated metal stent with a significantly lower rate of chest pain, according to data presented at a medical meeting on Sunday. Absorb works in the same way as traditional heart stents, propping open arteries that have been cleared of blockages to restore normal blood flow. The most notable difference observed after one year in the European study was the rate of angina, a type of chest pain associated with diminished blood flow to the heart. "The lower rate of chest pain observed in people treated with Absorb is a promising finding that shows that Absorb may offer people unique quality of life benefits beyond the excellent clinical outcomes already offered with drug eluting stents," Dr. Patrick Serruys, the study's lead investigator who presented the data at the Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) meeting in Washington, said in a statement.

4th doctor dies of Ebola in Sierra Leone
 

A child looks at a man suspected of suffering from the Ebola virus, while holding his hand over his nose, in a main street and busy part in Monrovia, Liberia, Friday, Sept. 12, 2014. A Western Kentucky University student has developed a way to track the Ebola virus outbreak. Armin Smailhodzic developed a smartphone app that uses Twitter data to track the virus. Western says the app could predict the spread of the virus.(AP Photo/Abbas Dulleh)FREETOWN, Sierra Leone (AP) — Sierra Leone has lost a fourth doctor to Ebola after a failed effort to transfer her abroad for medical treatment, a government official said Sunday, a huge setback to the impoverished country that is battling the virulent disease amid a shortage of health care workers.



Fourth Sierra Leonean doctor dies from Ebola
 

An medical worker checks their protective clothing in a mirror at a facility in Kailahun, Sierra Leone, on August 15, 2014Freetown (AFP) - A fourth Sierra Leonean doctor, a woman, died Sunday after contracting the dreaded Ebola virus, a top health official said, while a Dutch charity repatriated two doctors suspected of having been contaminated with the disease.



Scientists unveil magnetic cure for bad blood
 

A blood bag and test tubes filled with blood are pictured on July 6, 2012 in ParisActing rather like a spleen, the invention uses magnetic nanobeads coated with a genetically-engineered human blood protein called MBL. The MBL binds to pathogens and toxins, which can then be "pulled out" with a magnet, the developers wrote in the journal Nature Medicine. The "bio-spleen" was developed to treat sepsis, or blood infection, which affects 18 million people in the world every year, with a 30-50 percent mortality rate. If the invention is shown to be safe for humans, "patients could be treated with our bio-spleen and this will physically clean up their blood, rapidly removing a wide spectrum of live pathogens as well as dead fragments and toxins from the blood," study co-author Donald Ingber told AFP.



Possible measles exposure at Seattle airport, health officials warn
 Health officials in Washington state on Sunday warned people who used Seattle-Tacoma International Airport this month that they could have been exposed to measles after a passenger was confirmed to be carrying the virus. The passenger was at the airport on Sept. 6 during a period when the illness is contagious, and can spread easily through the air by breathing, coughing or sneezing, Public Health -Seattle & King County said in a news release. "The traveler was likely exposed to measles outside of the United States," the agency said. The passenger used the airport's north satellite terminal, the inter-terminal train and the baggage claim, and also dined at a restaurant at the Courtyard Seattle Federal Way hotel that evening, the agency said.

Costly eye drug and far cheaper alternative have similar side effects: study
 By Ben Hirschler LONDON (Reuters) - Injecting Roche's cancer drug Avastin as a cheap eye treatment does not appear to increase deaths or serious side effects, according to an independent study that is likely to fuel a row over the medicine's unapproved use. An analysis of nine clinical trials - including three unpublished ones - concluded that health policies favoring the much more expensive eye drug Lucentis over Avastin were not supported by current evidence. The study was published on Monday in The Cochrane Library journal, which is produced by the Cochrane Collaboration, a non-profit group that reviews trial data to assess the value of drugs. Avastin is not licensed for wAMD but it works in a similar way to authorized treatments for the condition - Lucentis, which is marketed by Novartis and Roche, and Eylea, from Bayer and Regeneron Pharmaceuticals.

Governments hold key to unlocking billions for social good: G8 report
 By Astrid Zweynert LONDON (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Governments can unleash billions of dollars to tackle social problems more effectively if they take bold steps to reduce barriers to investing for both profit and social good, a task force set up by the world's richest nations said on Monday. In its first report, the G8 Social Impact Investment Task Force calls on governments to make tax and regulatory reforms to catalyze the market in investments that generate social or environmental benefits alongside financial returns. "This is not about increasing or reducing public expenditure, but helping government to benefit from innovation and private sector capital in order to achieve more impact with the money it has," Ronald Cohen, the chair of the year-old task force, said in a statement. The report highlights the potential of so-called "impact investing" to help solve some of society's most pressing issues, such as caring for children and the elderly, community regeneration, financial inclusion, housing and prisoner reoffending.

China police detain 24 after anti-incinerator protest: newspaper
 Chinese police detained 24 people for disturbing social order during a protest on Saturday against a proposed trash incinerator in southern China, the state-run China Daily newspaper reported.

Liberia president sacks 10 officials told to return to fight Ebola
 

Johnson-Sirleaf attends the opening ceremony of the 22nd Ordinary Session of the African Union summit in Ethiopia's capital Addis AbabaBy James Harding Giahyue MONROVIA (Reuters) - Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf has sacked 10 senior officials because they failed to heed a warning to return from overseas travel to help the government's fight against an Ebola epidemic that has killed at least 1,100 Liberians. They were initially told in August to return to Liberia. "These government officials showed insensitivity to our national tragedy and disregard for authority," said the statement released late on Saturday. The contagious, haemorrhagic fever was first discovered in eastern Guinea in March and has since killed more than 2,400 people, mostly in Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea, making it the worst Ebola outbreak the world has seen.



Obama to detail plans on Ebola offensive on Tuesday: WSJ
 

Obama arrives to look at a copy of the original manuscript of Francis Scott Key's "The Star Spangled Banner" at Fort McHenry in BaltimorePresident Barack Obama is expected to detail on Tuesday a plan to boost his country's involvement in mitigating the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, the Wall Street Journal reported on Sunday. The outbreak has now killed upwards of 2,400 people, mostly in Liberia, neighboring Guinea and Sierra Leone as poorly resourced West African healthcare systems have been overrun. The move would come just days after Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf appealed to Obama for urgent aid, saying that without it her country would lose the fight against the disease.



Post-war counseling awaits Gaza children going back to school
 

The empty chair of a student is seen inside a class on the first day of the new school year in the east of Gaza CityBy Nidal al-Mughrabi GAZA (Reuters) - Some 500,000 children returned on Sunday to school in the Gaza Strip, where many will be given psychological counseling before regular studies begin after a devastating 50-day war between Palestinian militants and Israel. The opening of the school year had been delayed for three weeks because of damage to more than 250 schools and the use of about 90 U.N. educational facilities as shelters for tens of thousands of residents displaced by fighting, the United Nations and local authorities said. "The top priority now is making sure that after a period of psychosocial support, including the use of theater for development techniques, our students can return to their regular curricula," said Pierre Krähenbühl, head of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency, which runs more than 200 Gaza schools. He said UNRWA has employed over 200 counselors who would engage with the approximately 240,000 students in its schools, with a transition to standard studies scheduled in a week.



Venezuela's newest shortage: breast implants
 

In this Sept, 4, 2014 photo, a patient is prepped for her breast augmentation at the metropolitan outpatient surgery center in Caracas, Venezuela. Doctors say restrictive currency controls that deprive local businesses of the cash to import foreign goods have caused breast implants approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to disappear. It may not be the gravest shortfall facing the socialist South American country, but surgeons say the issue cuts to the psyche of the image-conscious Venezuelan woman. (AP Photo/Ariana Cubillos)CARACAS, Venezuela (AP) — Venezuela's chronic shortages have begun to encroach on a cultural cornerstone: the boob job.



Kids' poisonings linked to anti-addiction medicine
 

FILE - In this March 11, 2013 file photo, Shavonne Bullock, a recovering heroin addict, holds a demonstration dose of the medication Suboxone during an appointment at the West Division Family Health Center in Chicago. Each dose is incorporated on a dissolvable film, which is placed below the tongue where is dissolves and is absorbed into the bloodstream. Suboxone helps suppress withdrawal symptoms and reduce cravings for people recovering from addiction to opioid drugs. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green, File)CHICAGO (AP) — An anti-addiction drug used to fight the nation's heroin and painkiller abuse epidemics poses a threat to young children who accidentally swallow relatives' prescriptions, a federal study says. Some children have died.



Roche starts late-stage trial for eye drug lampalizumab
 

The logo of Swiss pharmaceutical company Roche is seen outside the Shanghai Roche Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd. headquarters in ShanghaiZURICH (Reuters) - Swiss drugmaker Roche said on Monday it had started late-stage trials for its experimental drug lampalizumab as a treatment for a serious eye disease. The Basel-based firm has initiated Phase III trials for lampalizumab as a treatment for geographic atrophy, a leading cause of blindness in adults over 55, which gradually causes vision loss in the macula, making it harder to read, drive and recognise people's faces. (Reporting by Caroline Copley)



Four burned in explosion at Arizona pet food factory
 (Reuters) - Four contractors were burned on Sunday in an explosion at an Arizona pet food factory, a fire department official said. The workers were welding in a grain elevator at the Nestle Purina plant in Flagstaff at around 4:30 p.m. when grain dust caught fire and sparked an explosion, said Flagstaff Fire Department Captain Bill Morse.

Sierra Rutile sees limited operations during Ebola lockdown
 

Health workers remove the body of Prince Nyentee, a man whom local residents said died of Ebola virus in Monrovia(Reuters) - Minerals group Sierra Rutile Ltd said its operations would be restricted during the three-day countrywide lockdown to halt the spread of Ebola across Sierra Leone and that it would optimise operations in the lead-up to mitigate overall impact of the disruption. The company, which mines rutile in the south west of Sierra Leone, said export of products to customers would not be affected and that essential services such as the power plant and a health clinic would continue to operate as normal. ...



Obama to detail plans on Ebola offensive Tuesday: WSJ
 

US President Obama and former President Clinton take part in AmeriCorps Pledge ceremony at White House in Washington(Reuters) - U.S. President Barack Obama is expected to detail on Tuesday a plan to boost his country's involvement in mitigating the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, the Wall Street Journal reported on Sunday. The plan would involve a greater involvement of the U.S. military in tackling the worst recorded outbreak of the deadly Ebola virus, the Journal reported, citing people familiar with the proposal. The outbreak has now killed upwards of 2,400 people, mostly in Liberia, neighbouring Guinea and Sierra Leone as poorly resourced West African healthcare systems have been overrun. The U.S. ...



Danaher to buy Nobel Biocare Holding for $2.2 billion including debt
 

Logo of Swiss medical device maker Nobel Biocare is pictured at the company's headquarters in ZurichDanaher said on Monday it would pay 17.10 Swiss francs per Nobel Biocare share in cash, about 23 percent above Nobel Biocare's closing price on July 28, the day before the Swiss firm said it was in talks with potential buyers. Nobel Biocare's shares fell 5.5 percent in early trade after analysts had said the company could fetch a price of over 20 francs per share. Analysts at Bank of America Merrill Lynch said it was unlikely a counter bid would materialise since fellow dental implant makers Straumann STMN.S and Dentsply XRAY.O had already ruled out interest. The acquisition of the world's second-biggest dental implant maker will bring Danaher a premium range of implants to add to its orthodontics and digital imaging systems and boost its dental business to sales of around $3 billion.



Australia probes 'threats' against hospitals days after stepping up terror alert
 Australian police were investigating "threats" on Monday against four hospitals in the city of Sydney amid reports of at least one being partially evacuated over a bomb threat, just days after the country raised its terror alert level to "high". Patients and hospital staff were evacuated from parts of Prince of Wales Private Hospital, while police also went to Royal Prince Alfred hospital, Longueville Private hospital and Royal North Shore hospital, media reported. Last Friday, Australia raised its terror threat level to "high" for the first time, citing the chance of terrorist attacks by Australian citizens radicalised in Iraq or Syria.

Taking insurance companies out of health care
 If Boeing experiment flies, health care system could be transformed

To make the most of a workout, experts say set the proper pace
 Setting the proper workout pace, or the distribution of energy during exercise, deflects boredom and fatigue, syncs body and mind, and enables the everyday exerciser to keep pushing the envelope. Dr. Kevin G. Thompson, author of “Pacing: Individual Strategies for Optimal Performance,” believes how people prepare their bodies and minds for activity is limited by their lack of understanding about how to pace the exercise. “Unless the athlete knows what the ideal pace is, how can he or she train properly to improve performance?” said Thompson, director of the Research Institute for Sport and Exercise at the University of Canberra, Australia. “That makes for a negative experience.” Group classes, which usually cater to all fitness levels, are generally paced around a bell curve model, explained Donna Cyrus, senior vice president of programming at Crunch, a chain of U.S.

Spanish judge orders release of ill boy's parents
 

This is an undated handout photos issued by England's Hampshire Police on Monday Sept. 1, 2014, of Brett King and Naghemeh King, the parents of Ashya King, who have legal proceedings against them continuing in Spain after they took the five-year-old brain cancer patient out of hospital without doctors' consent. Critically-ill 5-year-old boy Ashya King driven to Spain by his parents is receiving medical treatment for a brain tumor in a Spanish hospital as his parents await extradition to Britain, police said Sunday Aug. 31 2014. Officers received a phone call late Saturday from a hotel east of Malaga advising that a vehicle fitting the description circulated by police was on its premises. Both parents were arrested and the boy, Ashya King, was taken to a hospital, a Spanish police spokesman said. (AP Photo/Hampshire Police)SOTO DEL REAL, Spain (AP) — Spanish officials have ordered the immediate release of a detained British couple who were wanted by police in the United Kingdom after they took their critically ill child for treatment abroad without doctors' consent.



 
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