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An Apple a Day May Not Keep the Doctor Away After All, a New Study Finds
 An apple a day may not keep the doctor away but it couldn't hurt.

An apple a day may not keep the doctor away, study says
 

FILE - This Aug. 30, 2012, file photo, shows a variety of apples in Concord, N.H. A study published Monday, March 30, 2015, in JAMA Internal Medicine challenges the old adage: "An apple a day keeps the doctor away," finding daily apple eaters had just as many doctor visits as apple shunners. (AP Photo/Matthew Mead)CHICAGO (AP) — An apple a day doesn't necessarily keep the doctor away. That's according to proverb-busting research that found daily apple eaters had just as many doctor visits as those who ate fewer or no apples.



Child poverty impacts brain development: study
 

Child poverty impacts brain development: studyChildren of richer, better-educated parents have bigger brains and more cognitive skills than their less-fortunate peers, but social help and teaching can help to overcome the differences, a study published on Monday said. The impact was "meaningful in terms of the way the brain is working in these kids", study co-author Elizabeth Sowell of the University of Southern California told AFP. "We found that the relationship between brain (structure) and family income impacted kids' cognitive functioning," Sowell said by email. "It is not too late to think about how to impact resources that enrich the developmental environment, that in turn help the brain wire itself together," Sowell said.



Exercising critically ill patients may help speed recovery
 

In this photo provided by the Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, taken March 11, 2015 in the intensive care unit at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, physical therapist Katie Kellner helps patient Terry Culler do some exercises and briefly stand despite being hooked to a ventilator. There's increasing evidence that mild exercise may have its place even for the sickest ICU patients, and new animal research suggests it may target both muscles and lungs. (AP Photo/Warren Cameron Dennis III, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center)WASHINGTON (AP) — The intensive care unit is a last frontier for physical therapy: It's hard to exercise patients hooked to ventilators.



US Ebola patient's health improves again
 

Sierra Leone health officials check passengers at the border crossing with Liberia in Jendema on March 28, 2015An American healthcare worker who contracted the dangerous Ebola virus while working in Sierra Leone has improved and is now listed in fair condition, hospital officials said Monday. The man, whose identity has not been revealed, "has improved from serious to fair condition," said a statement from the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center. In a statement released on Thursday, PIH co-founder Paul Farmer said that the man had, "in the opinion of some of the best doctors and nurses in the world, turned the corner," after his condition improved from critical to serious. The patient was evacuated from Sierra Leone on March 14 and brought to the NIH's Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland just outside Washington for treatment.



Do You (Really) Know What's Good for You?
 

Should We File Bankruptcy Because of Business Debts?I don't generally watch morning television; I doubt that will much surprise anyone. But watching a bit of morning television is all but unavoidable when you are in fact on morning television. Most of the shows are running their own programming continuously on monitors in the so-called "green room."And so it is that I saw a bit of the Today show...



Sierra Leone back to work after Ebola lockdown
 

Sierra Leone health officials check passengers transiting at the border crossing with Liberia in Jendema in order to prevent the spread of Ebola on March 28, 2015Sierra Leoneans breathed a sigh of relief on Monday as they emerged from a three-day nationwide lockdown imposed in a bid to prevent a resurgence of the deadly Ebola virus. The country's population of more than six million had been confined to their homes starting early on Friday, for the second time in six months, on orders from President Ernest Bai Koroma. "Stepping out this morning, I took several sniffs of the fresh air and said 'thank you, Lord'," hawker Tommy Carew smiled as he returned to the streets in the capital Freetown. The lockdown was called over fears the disease that has killed almost a third of the 12,000 people infected in Sierra Leone was making a comeback around the capital and in the north.



Guinea shuts border with Sierra Leone in effort to end Ebola
 CONAKRY, Guinea (AP) — Guinea closed its border with Sierra Leone on Monday as part of new efforts to stamp out Ebola, an official said.

Spanish hospital conducts complex face transplant
 

A Spanish hospital successfully carries out the world's most complex face transplant, reconstructing the lower face, neck, mouth, tongue and back of the throat of a man terribly disfigured by diseaseA Spanish hospital said Monday it has successfully carried out the world's most complex face transplant, reconstructing the lower face, neck, mouth, tongue and back of the throat of a man terribly disfigured by disease. A team of 45 physicians, nurses, anaesthesiologists and other health professionals carried out the 27-hour operation in early February at Barcelona's Vall d'Hebron University Hospital, the hospital said in a statement. "This is the first time that a transplant of this complexity is performed in the world," the statement said. The man had been examined in several other hospitals, including the Mayo Clinic and Harvard Medical School in the United States, which had considered him to be inoperable but the Barcelona hospital ruled surgery was his only treatment option.



Why You Should Care About GNC's New Supplement Guidelines
 GNC responds to investigation revealing mislabeling of ginseng, echinacea and others.

How to Change the Habits of 107,000 People
 It was 1995, and Pieter Ernst was battling a serious problem.Ernst was a physician with an interest in community-wide behavior change, and he was currently in Mozambique. For nearly 20 years, a brutal civil war had ravaged the population and landscape of the country.The war had ended three years earlier, but the entire health care system of the...

Arizona governor signs abortion drug notification mandate
 PHOENIX (AP) — Gov. Doug Ducey signed a bill Monday that requires abortion providers in Arizona to tell women they can reverse the effects of a drug-induced abortion and also bars women from buying any health care plan through the federal marketplace that includes abortion coverage.

Mexico double-transplant patient gets US humanitarian pass
 

FILE - In this May 2, 2014, file photo, Jose Chua Lopez, left, holds hands with his mother, Myra Lopez Martinez, during a news conference in Hermosillo, Mexico. Family and friends raised thousands of dollars to send Jose Chua Lopez to the prestigious Mayo Clinic for an urgently needed heart and liver transplant. But the 20-year-old Mexican born with a heart defect has twice been turned down for a U.S. visa, and relatives and his doctor say his life is in danger. (AP Photo/El Imparcial) MANDATORY CREDIT MEXICO OUTMEXICO CITY (AP) — The U.S. Department of Homeland Security gave a 90-day humanitarian pass to a 20-year-old Mexican man seeking a double heart and liver transplant, his mother said Monday.



Pharmacist group says members shouldn't aid in executions
 

FILE - This May 27, 2008 file photo shows the State of Texas execution chamber in Huntsville, Texas. A leading association for pharmacists on Monday has approved a proposal declaring that participation in lethal injection executions by compounding pharmacies would be a violation of core pharmacy values. (AP Photo/Pat Sullivan, File)SAN DIEGO (AP) — In a move that could heighten the hurdles faced by states attempting to execute prisoners, a leading association for U.S. pharmacists has officially discouraged its members from providing drugs for use in lethal injections.



National Eating Disorder Awareness Group Endorses Aerie Underwear
 Underwear line gets high praise for using unretouched model photos.

Take Back Your Life One Hour At a Time
 

Take Back Your Life One Hour At a TimeHave you been at dinner and the person at the next table takes a business call, of which you hear everything? Or at the movies and in front of you, someone is checking their email? Maybe you've been out for a walk and instead of enjoying the scenery, people all around have their earbuds in, missing the first callings of spring. Perhaps that...



5-Year-Old Detroit Shooting Victim Trades an Eye for an 'Aye' in Pirate-Themed Party
 Donovan Lyles Jr. was struck by a stray bullet from a random shooting. He lost his eye but not his spirit.

7 Easy Ways to Boost Your Metabolism
 

7 Easy Ways to Boost Your MetabolismBy K. Aleisha Fetters, DETAILS(photo: Eric Ray Davidson)While marathon sweat sessions can certainly kick your metabolism into high gear, there's a faster, better way to rev up your fat-burning potential. Below are seven seriously simple moves that will slash through more calories than minutes."Your metabolism is the sum of everything your body...



Spain to restore free health care for illegal immigrants
 

Spain's conservative government will restore free health care for illegal immigrants, overturning a controversial decision taken three years agoSpain's conservative government said Tuesday it would restore free health care for illegal immigrants, overturning a controversial decision taken three years ago. Under a reform that came into place in September 2012, foreigners without residency papers lost their national health cards which allowed them free treatment in local public health clinics. Illegal immigrants who are over 18 only get free treatment in case of an emergency, pregnancy or birth. "It is more sensible and reasonable that this care be given in health centres so emergency wards are not saturated," Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy said as he announced that all undocumented immigrants would once again come within the fold of the public health system.



This Is Nursing
 

This Is NursingThis is why I fell in love with my coworkers and with our nursing profession. I cannot look at this picture without getting a little teary. If you're religious, what religion you practice, whatever it is you may believe in... none of it matters. When we've had a horrific outcome, when we have had a close call, when one of our own is sick, we...



1,000-Year-Old Eye Infection Salve May Kill MRSA Super Bug, Study Shows
 Could a tenth century eye salve be the secret to fighting modern super bugs?

Life. Life. Now!
 

Life. Life. Now!This a talk from the Beyond Conference I gave in March, 2015 about living life in the present. I spoke about my weight loss journey and recovering from a seizure I had in October, 2014.



Ebola scare shows problems in computer models
 

Sierra Leone health officials check passengers transiting at the border crossing with Liberia in Jendema in order to prevent the spread of Ebola on March 28, 2015Flaws in computer modelling led to apocalyptic forecasts of how the deadly Ebola virus would spread in West Africa, specialists said. Many of the models were off-the-shelf software that failed to take into account complexities and uncertainties in the way the disease spread in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia, they said on Tuesday. "In the early days of the Ebola outbreak, a lot of people got into the forecasting business," said Aaron King of the University of Michigan in the United States, who led a probe into why so many predictions turned out to be wildly wrong. "They did it using appealingly simple mathematical models, and the result was a series of warnings that alerted the world, quite rightly to the seriousness of the situation.



Health providers' stand could invite other execution methods
 

FILE - This May 27, 2008 file photo shows the State of Texas execution chamber in Huntsville, Texas. A leading association for pharmacists on Monday has approved a proposal declaring that participation in lethal injection executions by compounding pharmacies would be a violation of core pharmacy values. (AP Photo/Pat Sullivan, File)SAN DIEGO (AP) — With the American Pharmacists Association taking a stance this week, the medical community is now united in its opposition to playing any role in capital punishment killings.



Texas measure cuts HIV funds, boost abstinence education
 AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Texas would cut $3 million from programs to prevent HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases and spend that money instead on abstinence education under a contentious Republican-sponsored measure tucked into the state budget Tuesday night.

3-D print technology provides 'robohand' to 7-year-old girl
 

Faith Lennox, 7, left, shows her mother Nicole her newly 3-D printed hand at the Build it Workspace in Los Alamitos, Calif., on Tuesday, March 31, 2015. Build It Workspace is a 3-D printer studio that teaches people to use high-tech printers and provides access to them for projects. Faith's new hand is the result of an emerging technology that is revolutionizing prosthetics, said Build It's Mark Lengsfeld, especially for children like Faith, who quickly outgrow expensive prosthetic limbs and have trouble even using them because of their size and weight. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)LOS ALAMITOS, Calif. (AP) — Seven-year-old Faith Lennox never thought much about putting a prosthetic limb where her missing left hand had once been.



Senior drivers strive to stay on the road
 

Don Robertson, 66, right, smiles as he prepares to give a lift to Mary Roberts, 88, amid a snowstorm on the first day of spring in Toms River, NJ on March 20, 2015Don Robertson isn't the type to let a snowstorm on the first day of spring -- or his age -- stop him from doing his appointed rounds. "Driving means to keep motivated," says "Mr. Don" as he set outs in his SUV to pick up a fellow Jersey Shore senior who no longer holds a driver's license. Nearly 85 percent held driver's licenses in 2010, compared to barely half in the early 1970s, according to American Automobile Association (AAA) research. "We know through research that older drivers are among the safest on the road," said Jacob Nelson, the AAA's director of traffic safety advocacy and research.



Stigma stalks India's leprosy sufferers as disease returns
 

A leprosy patient looks out of her living quarters in a leprosy colony in New DelhiGanga Kalshetty was just two years old when India declared itself leprosy-free in 2005, giving her family hope that she would be spared the disfiguring disease and its social stigma. Kalshetty lives in one of India's dozens of informal "leper colonies", where many of her relatives are afflicted with the disease. Seven months ago her worst fears came true when she, too, was diagnosed with the disease. "I don't want to suffer like her," the 12-year-old told AFP as she glanced at her grandmother's clawed hands, a hallmark of leprosy sufferers, at the family's home in New Delhi.



World's oldest person dies at 117 in Japan
 

Misao Okawa on March 4, 2015The world's oldest person, Misao Okawa, died in Japan on Wednesday, a month after celebrating her 117th birthday. When she turned 114, she was officially recognised by Guinness World Records as the oldest woman in the globe. Japan, known for the longevity of its people, is home to the world's oldest man -- Sakari Momoi, who celebrated his 112th birthday in February. In 2013, life expectancy for women in Japan was 86.61, the longest in the world followed by Hong Kong women, according to the health ministry.



Where Do the World's Hungriest People Live? Not Where You Think
 If you were tasked to end hunger and malnutrition in the world, you might first ask: Where do such vulnerable people live? It may be a surprise that the majority of the world's hungry and malnourished live in large Middle Income Countries (MICs), some of which are global economic powerhouses. These countries are hosts to the Missing Middle, or...

Ethiopian maid 'accuses WHO official in Thailand of slavery'
 

Thai police are probing a senior Bangkok-based World Health Organization official and his wife after their Ethiopian maid accuses them of modern-day slavery and physical abuseThai police said Wednesday they are investigating a senior Bangkok-based World Health Organization official and his wife after their Ethiopian maid accused them of modern-day slavery and physical abuse. The 25-year-old maid filed a complaint last month accusing her employers of beating her and forcing her to work without pay for nearly two years at their residence in a plush expat colony in Nonthaburi, a northern satellite city of Bangkok, police said. "They (the official and his wife) have been accused of human trafficking, tricking her to work, failing to pay her and abuse," Police Colonel Mana Tienmaungpak, head of investigations at Pakkred police station in Nonthaburi, told AFP. The maid's lawyer Surapong Kongchantuk from the Lawyers Council of Thailand confirmed his client had worked for a "high-ranking WHO representative" from July 2013 until early March.



Exclusive: Republican White House hopefuls attack Obamacare but take money
 

Deadline Approaches To Signup For Health Insurance Under Affordable Care ActBy Andy Sullivan WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Several Republican governors likely to run for president have secured hundreds millions of dollars under Obamacare while working to dismantle the healthcare law, according to a Reuters review of federal spending records. Governors Scott Walker of Wisconsin, Chris Christie of New Jersey, Bobby Jindal of Louisiana and former Texas Governor Rick Perry, all staunch opponents of President Barack Obama's 2010 Affordable Care Act, have collectively applied for and won at least $352 million through grant programs set up by the law, federal records show. "Receiving federal grants that existed prior to the ACA is not the same as participating in the core elements of the ACA." The money in question stems from less controversial parts of the law that enhance public health and other nuts-and-bolts programs, rather than the insurance exchanges and expansion of the Medicaid program for the poor that have drawn fierce opposition from Republicans.



Why Your Brain Will Trick You This April Fool's Day
 Turns out your brain is predisposed to believe silly April Fool's Day pranks.

Avril Lavigne and Lyme Disease: Your Questions Answered
 Singer Avril Lavigne revealed in the latest issue of People Magazine that she has been diagnosed with Lyme disease.

Spring Cleaning for the Soul
 

Spring Cleaning for the SoulWe all know that this winter has been pretty rough with the seemingly endless blizzards, ice storms and sub-zero weather. But March marks the beginning of spring -- the season of change. Mother Nature runs her course, thawing life out of the winter cold and breathing new life into spring. People seem to reflect that same change this time of...



LGBTQ Health Disparities Have Been Eliminated
 

LGBTQ Health Disparities Have Been EliminatedI've worked in the field of LGBTQ health my whole adult life. Frankly, considering the depth of our disparities, I felt that I would have job security forever. After a careful analysis of the latest federal LGBTQ surveillance data, I'm extremely pleased to announce that the unthinkable has indeed occurred: LGBTQ health disparities have been...



Questions persist about sexual effects of baldness drug
 

Questions persist about sexual effects of baldness drugA review of 34 clinical trials on a popular drug to treat hair loss in men found that none of the studies adequately reported on sexual side effects, researchers said Wednesday. The findings raise serious questions about whether the drug -- known as finasteride and marketed as Propecia and Proscar, among other names -- is safe, said the report by scientists at Northwestern University, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Dermatology. The drug, approved in 1992, works by interfering with testosterone, and the pharmaceutical giant Merck lists decreased sex drive, impotence and problems with ejaculation among its common side effects.



"New wave" of GMOs: pink pineapples, purple tomatoes
 

This image provided by The John Innes Centre, UK, shows a salad made with red and purple tomatoes. A small British company is planning to apply for U.S. permission to produce and sell purple tomatoes that have high levels of anthocyanins, compounds found in blueberries that some studies show lower the risk of cardiovascular disease and cancer. The Food and Drug Administration would have to approve any health claims used to sell the products. Cancer-fighting pink pineapples, heart-healthy purple tomatoes and less fatty vegetable oils may someday be on grocery shelves alongside more traditional products. (AP Photo/Andrew Davis, The John Innes Centre, UK)WASHINGTON (AP) — With recent government approval of potatoes that don't bruise and apples that don't brown, a new generation of genetically modified foods is headed to grocery shelves.



10 Ways to Help Your Kid Get a Good Night's Sleep
 

10 Ways to Help Your Kid Get a Good Night's SleepBy Erin Wilkey Oh, Common Sense Media editorParents know firsthand the impact a poor night's sleep has on kids. Lack of sleep can contribute to crankiness, problems with attention and learning, behavioral issues and even health problems such as obesity. Though the reasons for poor sleep vary, many parents worry that media and technology...



10 Ebola cases found during Sierra Leone's shutdown
 

A ambulances passes through a checkpoint in Sierra Leone, as the country enters the third and final day of a three day country wide lockdown on movement of people to combat the Ebola virus in the city of Freetown, Sierra Leone, Sunday, March. 29, 2015. The West African countries hit hardest by Ebola are ramping up efforts to eradicate the deadly disease using lockdowns, restrictions on burials and a warning to survivors about the potential dangers of unprotected sex.(AP Photo/ Michael Duff)FREETOWN, Sierra Leone (AP) — Sierra Leone found 10 new Ebola cases during a three-day countrywide shutdown, an official said Wednesday, declaring that the West African country is now at the "tail end" of the epidemic.



 
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