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8 Common Worries That Aren't Worth Stressing About
 

8 Common Worries That Aren't Worth Stressing AboutYou know the saying, "Worrying is like a rocking chair. It'll give you something to do, but it doesn't get you anywhere"? Well, it's true: Worrying is a complete and utter misuse of our energy, power, and imagination. All of us have fears, "what if's," and incessant mental chatter about what...



Exercise during teens reaps long-term benefits for women, study shows
 

Precious Perez and her team-mates do conditioning exercises at a goalball practice in Malden, MassachusettsBy Patricia Reaney NEW YORK (Reuters) - Playing team sports and exercising during adolescence can have long-lasting benefits for women and may even reduce their risk of dying from cancer and other causes later in life, a new study showed on Friday. "The main finding is that exercise during adolescence is associated with a reduced risk of mortality, or death, in middle aged to older women," Sarah J. Nechuta, an assistant professor of medicine at Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center and Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center in Nashville, said in an interview. Women who were physically active in their teens had a 16 percent lower risk of dying from cancer and a 15 percent decreased risk of death from all causes, according to the study.



Gunmen open fire at Sri Lanka election rally, one dead
 By Shihar Aneez COLOMBO (Reuters) - One person was killed and 13 wounded on Friday in a drive-by shooting at a Sri Lankan election rally attended by the finance minister, a further act of political violence in a nation still recovering from civil war. Finance Minister Ravi Karunanayake called the attack an "act of political terrorism" and blamed forces loyal to former president Mahinda Rajapaksa, who is attempting a comeback at next month's general election. The body of a woman was brought to Colombo National Hospital and 14 people were admitted with gunshot wounds.

Vaccine success holds hope for end to deadly scourge of Ebola
 By Kate Kelland and Tom Miles LONDON/GENEVA (Reuters) - The world is on the verge of being able to protect humans against Ebola, the World Health Organization said on Friday, as a trial in Guinea found a vaccine to have been 100 percent effective.     Initial results from the trial, which tested Merck and NewLink Genetics’ VSV-ZEBOV vaccine on some 4,000 people who had been in close contact with a confirmed Ebola case, showed complete protection after 10 days.     The results were described as "remarkable" and "game changing" by global health specialists. ...

Fitness and Diet Tips to Get the Best Body of Your Life From the Hottest Celeb Trainer
 

Fitness and Diet Tips to Get the Best Body of Your Life From the Hottest Celeb TrainerChristine Bullock is one of the most inspirational celebrity fitness trainers in Los Angeles with a wealth of knowledge regarding exercise, health and nutrition. I recently met her at a press event in Santa Monica earlier this summer where she taught an incredible fitness class followed by a Q and A session on nutrition and healthy living. I...



For seniors, sexual activity is linked to higher quality of life
 By Madeline Kennedy (Reuters Health) - Older adults who value sexual activity and engage in it have better social lives and psychological well-being, according to a small study in Scotland Older adults said "they miss and want to engage in sexual behaviors, whether that be a kiss to intercourse," said study coauthor Taylor-Jane Flynn in an email. "For many, these behaviors remained an important element in their life." Flynn, a psychology PhD candidate at Glasgow Caledonian University, said the study was inspired by her work as a health care assistant for elderly people. Although quality of life is a key consideration for older adults, sexuality is rarely studied, write Flynn and Alan Gow, an associate professor of psychology at Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh, in the journal Age and Ageing.

A smarter way to track your asthma symptoms
 

A smarter way to track your asthma symptomsA new, free-to-download app from non-profit Allergy & Asthma Network could help people better monitor and understand how asthma affects them or their children and provide potentially valuable insights for healthcare professionals. Called the Asthma Storylines app and available for the iPhone, Android and the desktop, it can be used for tracking everything from frequency of specific symptoms and emotional impact, to setting up reminders for taking medication or for medical appointments. The idea of the app is to create a comprehensive picture of how asthma manifests itself in an individual over time and potentially identify triggers as much as patterns.



5 Tips for Making New Girlfriends
 

5 Tips for Making New GirlfriendsHave you ever caught yourself thinking that you could really use some new girlfriends?Maybe you've moved for a job, outgrown your old circle of friends, recently ended a relationship, or just looked up one day and realized you just didn't have many.You are not alone sister! Almost every woman I've talked to agrees that they'd love more friends,...



At the Heart of the Matter: Women Need Better Testing Options
 

At the Heart of the Matter: Women Need Better Testing OptionsWe know cardiovascular care has come such a long way in the last decade or so. What many don't know is that care is based on studies that represent a huge sex disparity. Only 24 percent of participants in all heart-related studies are women. For the last 50 years women's treatment has largely been based on medical research conducted primarily...



Western companies look hard at China as growth slows
 

The corporate logo of Ford is seen at a Ford branch in CaracasBy Tom Bergin LONDON (Reuters) - The Chinese slowdown is forcing many Western companies to take a hard look at their businesses there, leading many to reduce investments, costs and product lines and to tackle increasing bad debts. Double digit growth rates during the first decade of the millennium lured scores of Western companies to invest heavily in China. A recent equities market rout has dashed hopes China will, in the coming years, return to the robust growth it saw in the past.



UN Ebola mission winds down, WHO takes reins in West Africa
 

FILE - In this Sunday, Jan. 25, 2015 file photo, China's Margaret Chan, Director General of the World Health Organization, WHO, addresses her statement during the special session on Ebola of the Executive Board, at the headquarters of the WHO in Geneva, Switzerland. An experimental vaccine tested on thousands of people in Guinea exposed to Ebola seems to work and might help shut down the ongoing epidemic in West Africa, according to interim results from a study published Friday, July 31, 2015. (Salvatore Di Nolfi/Keystone via AP, File)LONDON (AP) — The United Nations Mission for Ebola Emergency Response is officially winding down Friday, handing its leadership role and senior staff to the Geneva-based World Health Organization as efforts to contain the deadly virus continue.



Hillary Clinton takes on Jeb Bush on racial equality issues
 

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at the National Urban League's conference in Fort LauderdaleBy Zachary Fagenson FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (Reuters) - Democrat Hillary Clinton sought to persuade African-Americans on Friday to resist any temptation to side with Republican Jeb Bush in the 2016 presidential race as they offered differing visions on how to tackle economic and racial inequality. The annual convention of the National Urban League marked the first same-stage appearance for Clinton, front-runner for the Democratic presidential nomination, and Bush, one of the leading candidates in the Republican race. Democrats have long counted on African Americans as a loyal voting bloc, whereas the Republican Party acknowledged after its loss in the 2012 presidential race that it needed to build support among minorities to win the presidency.



In a Yemen hospital, malnutrition menaces young lives
 

A Picture And Its Story: A Life in The BalanceBy Khaled Abdullah SANAA (Reuters) - Born just before the outbreak of Yemen's devastating war, Ali Mohammed al-Tawaari may well not survive it. Ali suffers malnourishment and complications from a botched circumcision performed by an unqualified practitioner. When the war began in March, between the country’s Houthi movement and an exiled government backed by Gulf Arab states, hundreds of foreign, mostly Asian, medical staff members, were evacuated to their countries, leaving their jobs in Yemeni hospitals.



Experimental Ebola vaccine could stop virus in West Africa
 

FILE - In this March 7, 2015 file photo, a health worker, right, cleans a man's arm before injecting him with a Ebola vaccine in Conakry, Guinea. An experimental vaccine tested on thousands of people in Guinea exposed to Ebola seems to work and might help shut down the ongoing epidemic in West Africa, according to interim results from a study published Friday, July 31, 2015. There is currently no licensed treatment or vaccine for Ebola, which has so far killed more than 11,000 people in West Africa since the world’s biggest outbreak began last year. (AP Photo/ Youssouf Bah, File)LONDON (AP) — An experimental Ebola vaccine tested on thousands of people in Guinea seems to work and might help shut down the waning epidemic in West Africa, according to interim results from a study published Friday.



FDA says investigating latest cyclosporiasis outbreak
 (Reuters) - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said it is investigating the latest outbreak of cyclosporiasis in the United States. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has been notified of about 358 confirmed cases of the infection until Thursday, the FDA said in a statement on its website. Fresh cilantro from Puebla has been linked by health officials to the 2013 and 2014 annual cyclosporiasis outbreaks as well.

Rio Olympics: How Athletes May Cope With Polluted Waterways
 Experts weigh on dealing with polluted waterways.

Facebook CEO Zuckerberg and wife expecting a baby girl
 

Mark Zuckerberg, founder and CEO of Facebook, and wife Priscilla Chan arrive on the red carpet during the 2nd annual Breakthrough Prize Award in Mountain View, CaliforniaBy Yasmeen Abutaleb SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - Facebook Inc Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg and his wife, Priscilla Chan, are expecting a baby girl, he said on his Facebook page on Friday. Zuckerberg, 31, did not say when their daughter is due but said the pregnancy was far enough along that the risk of miscarriage was low. Zuckerberg, who often uses his Facebook page to make both corporate and personal announcements, opened up about the emotions he and Chan, who is a doctor, have felt while trying to have children.



Burden
 

Burden"Remember... No burden is worthy of becoming you. You'll always have enough independence to make sure of that." -- Chris KairosI always saw myself as an independent kind of person. The kind of person who strived to achieve everything I wanted and needed on my own first before ever reaching out for help from anyone else. I was raised to believe...



Hillary Clinton given clean bill of health by her doctor
 

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at the National Urban League's conference in Fort LauderdaleBy Steve Holland WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton is healthy and "fit to serve" with no lingering effects from a 2012 concussion that caused a health scare when she was secretary of state, her personal physician said on Friday. The Clinton campaign released a statement from her doctor, Lisa Bardack of Mount Kisco, New York, that detailed the health status of Clinton, the front-runner to represent the Democratic Party in the November 2016 presidential election. It said she takes blood thinners daily to guard against blood clots that have arisen on three occasions, in 1998, 2009 and 2012, and suffers from hypothyroidism.



Correction: Colorado Fluoride Debate story
 DENVER (AP) — In a story July 30 about a debate over adding fluoride to public drinking water, The Associated Press misspelled the last name of the director for the Fluoride Action Network. His name is Paul Connett, not Paul Commett.

Flavoring, other additives increase cigarettes’ addictiveness
 By Lisa Rapaport and Janice Neumann (Reuters Health) - Ingredients that help enhance the appeal of “light” and “low-tar” cigarettes may contribute to the addictiveness of smoking, a study suggests. Researchers scoured more than 7 million tobacco industry documents to see how additives known as pyrazines were being used and found these ingredients were introduced after consumers in the 1960s rejected the first “low-tar” cigarettes as being flavorless. While nicotine, a stimulant in tobacco, has long been known to be addictive, the study offers fresh evidence that tobacco companies may have added pyrazines to cigarettes to support this addiction, said Dr. Maciej Goniewicz, a researcher at Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, New York.

More research links sedentary time to diabetes
 By Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - People who are inactive for hours on end each day may be more likely to develop diabetes than people who spend more time moving around, a study confirms. “We are beginning to believe that being highly sedentary is something different than not getting exercise,” said lead author Bethany Barone Gibbs, a researcher in health and physical activity at the University of Pittsburgh. “Someone who runs 30 minutes every day can sit for the other 15 hours of the day at work, commuting, and at home and this person would be considered physically active but also quite sedentary,” Gibbs said by email.

Male caregivers may be less likely to ask for help
 By Kathryn Doyle (Reuters Health) - Among unpaid, informal caregivers of older people with illness or disability, male caregivers in particular can be ambivalent about asking for help, according to a new review. Caregivers are often family or close friends. In the U.K., for example, 58% of informal caregivers are female, according to lead author Dr. Nan Greenwood of Kingston University and St George’s at the University of London.

FDA warns of security flaw in Hospira infusion pumps
 By Jim Finkle BOSTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Friday advised hospitals not to use Hospira Inc's Symbiq infusion system, saying a security vulnerability could allow cyber attackers to take remote control of the system. The agency issued the advisory some 10 days after the U.S. Department of Homeland Security warned of the vulnerability in the pump, which is used to deliver medications directly into the bloodstream of patients. The FDA and DHS cited research from independent cyber security expert Billy Rios, who found that remote attacks could be launched on patients by accessing a hospital's network.

Boeing team to analyze plane debris found on Reunion Island
 (Reuters) - Boeing Co said on Friday it will dispatch a team to assist in analyzing plane debris found on Reunion Island in the Indian Ocean. Malaysia is "almost certain" that the debris found on the island is from a Boeing 777, the deputy transport minister said on Thursday, heightening the possibility it could be wreckage from missing Flight MH370. Malaysia Airlines was operating a Boeing 777 on the ill-fated flight, which vanished in March last year en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing in one of the most baffling mysteries in aviation history.

Injured nurses file lawsuit over Colorado helicopter crash
 Two Colorado flight nurses critically injured in the fiery crash of a medical transport helicopter that killed the pilot earlier this month sued the aircraft's manufacturer and operator on Friday, court records showed. David Repsher, 45, and Matthew Bowe, 32, were injured on July 3 when the Flight For Life helicopter they were aboard crashed on take-off from the St. Anthony Summit Medical Center in Frisco, a mountain town about 70 miles west of Denver. The pilot, Patrick Mahany, was killed in the crash.

Chimps in New York animal rights lawsuit to be retired from lab
 By Katie Reilly NEW YORK (Reuters) - The chimpanzees at the center of a New York State Supreme Court case over the legal rights of animals will no longer be used for research, officials at the State University of New York at Stony Brook said on Friday. The retirement of the chimps, named Hercules and Leo, follows a failed bid by an animal rights group in state court to get the primates released on legal grounds. The Nonhuman Rights Project, which advocates for the legal rights of animals, in March sued Stony Brook, where the chimps were used for physiological research.

Judge blocks release of recordings by anti-abortion group
 SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A federal judge has blocked the release of any recordings made at meetings of abortion providers by an anti-abortion group that previously revealed secretly recorded videos of a Planned Parenthood leader.

Anti-abortion group is sued over video releases
 

An abortion protester offers a pamphlet to a woman being escorted by a volunteer in front of a Planned Parenthood clinic in Boston, MassachusettsIn a complaint filed in San Francisco federal court, the National Abortion Federation, a nonprofit representing abortion providers, accused the Center for Medical Progress and its founder, David Daleiden, of illegally infiltrating and recording its private meetings. U.S. District Judge William Orrick late Friday issued a temporary restraining order blocking the defendants from releasing videos and audio recordings containing NAF member names and addresses, and dates and locations of future meetings, pending a hearing on Monday. Orrick said the NAF would likely prevail on the merits of its lawsuit, and said it could face "harassment, intimidation, violence, invasion of privacy, and injury to reputation" absent a halt.



Clinton releases tax, health records on busy Friday
 

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton waves as she is introduced before speaking to the National Urban League, Friday, July 31, 2015, in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)WASHINGTON (AP) — Hillary Rodham Clinton and her husband paid close to $44 million in federal taxes since 2007 and she is in "excellent physical condition" — two facts that emerged Friday in a flood of disclosures about the Democratic presidential candidate pushed out by her campaign on a busy summer day.



Record Heat: How the Body Reacts to Soaring Temperatures
 

Record Heat: How the Body Reacts to Soaring TemperaturesOfficials in both Iran and Iraq declared a mandatory holiday this month after temperatures soared far into the triple digits. In Iraq, temperatures reached a sweltering 126 degrees and officials declared a mandatory holiday to try and protect people from succumbing to the heat. In Iran, the country faced possible record-breaking temperatures and high humidity that will leave residents feeling they are in temperatures as high as 151.2 degrees Fahrenheit, or 66.2 degrees Celsius.



1st legal medical pot sold in Nevada 15 years after approval
 

Dozens of people line up outside the Silver State Relief medical marijuana dispensary in Sparks, Nev., Friday, July 31, 2015, to be among the first in Nevada to legally purchase medicinal pot. Nevadans voted to legalize medical marijuana in 2000, but no language was in place to establish a system to sell or distribute it until 2013. (AP Photo/Scott Sonner)SPARKS, Nev. (AP) — Fifteen years after Nevadans voted to legalize it, medical marijuana was sold legally in the state for the first time Friday at a dispensary in a strip mall about 5 miles east of downtown Reno.



Olympics-Rio pledges cleaner waters for Olympics next year
 By Karolos Grohmann KUALA LUMPUR, Aug 1 (Reuters) - Efforts to improve the water quality for the Rio de Janeiro 2016 Olympics are ongoing, Games organisers said on Saturday, adding the welfare of the athletes was a top priority after reports of severe pollution off the shores of the Brazilian metropolis. Privately commissioned tests of the water quality, where rowers, sailors and open water swimmers will be competing, revealed this week a high level of disease-causing viruses. "The bay is the most iconic part of the Rio 2016 legacy," Games communications chief Mario Andrada told the International Olympics Committee in a progress presentation just over a year before the Games start on Aug 5, 2016.

India court concludes hearing Maggi noodles case
 

A view of a roadside Maggi noodles eatery is pictured in New DelhiAn Indian court has concluded hearing a case filed by Nestle India challenging a local regulator's report that Maggi instant noodles contained excess lead, a lawyer for the company said. The Bombay High Court will give a judgment at a later date, Rajesh Batra said in a statement late on Friday. Nestle has been at the center of India's worst food scare in a decade after a regulator in the northern state of Uttar Pradesh in May said it found excess lead in a sample of the firm's popular Maggi noodles.



Rio pledges cleaner waters for Olympics next year
 By Karolos Grohmann KUALA LUMPUR (Reuters) - Efforts to improve the water quality for the Rio de Janeiro 2016 Olympics are ongoing, Games organizers said on Saturday, adding the welfare of the athletes was a top priority after reports of severe pollution off the shores of the Brazilian metropolis. Privately commissioned tests of the water quality, where rowers, sailors and open water swimmers will be competing, revealed this week a high level of disease-causing viruses. The waters along Rio's Atlantic coast, including Guanabara Bay where sailing events will be held, have been polluted for years and successive governments have spent hundreds of millions of dollars on supposed clean-ups to little effect.

Virginia pursuing school policing reforms following Center probe
 Virginia pursuing changes in wake of Center probe

Breakthrough in quest for Ebola vaccine
 

The World Health Organization began human trials of the VSV-ZEBOV vaccine across Guinea in March 2015An Ebola test vaccine provided blanket protection in a field trial in Guinea, researchers said, possibly heralding "the beginning of the end" for the devastating West African outbreak that has killed thousands. The serum was 100 percent effective after a week in more than 7,600 people inoculated, according to results published in The Lancet medical journal and hailed as "extremely promising" by World Health Organization (WHO) chief Margaret Chan. The world was "on the verge of an effective Ebola vaccine," the UN's health agency said in a statement.



Kenya mulls granting refuge to chimps from Ebola-hit Liberia
 

A chimp swings from a branch at the Jane Goodall Institute Chimpanzee Eden sanctuaryBy Edith Honan NAIROBI (Reuters) - Kenyan officials said on Friday they were considering conservationists' appeals to give two baby chimpanzees, rescued from possible traffickers in ebola-hit Liberia, sanctuary in a Kenyan reserve but public health fears were holding up transfer. Conservationists believe the animals had been victims of trafficking that sent baby chimps from West and Central Africa to Chinese zoos and private estates in the Middle East, where they can fetch as much as $25,000. Ebola has killed more than 11,200 people in West Africa since it broke out in December 2013.



NYC Doctor, Who Survived Ebola, Says Experimental Vaccine Could Be 'A Way Forward'
 

NYC Doctor, Who Survived Ebola, Says Experimental Vaccine Could Be 'A Way Forward'A New York City doctor, who made headlines after he was diagnosed with Ebola, said he hoped an experimental vaccine could be “a way forward” for a region decimated by the deadly virus. Craig Spencer, an emergency room physician at NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center, made headlines last year when he contracted Ebola after treating patients for the disease in Guinea. After his treatment Spencer returned to Guinea to treat patients and he got to see firsthand how the vaccine trial affected patients and health care workers.



Fetal tissue research declining, still important
 

A woman sits with a sign showing a baby as she attends a "Women Betrayed Rally to Defund Planned Parenthood" at Capitol Hill in WashingtonBy Julie Steenhuysen CHICAGO (Reuters) - A political battle over the use of fetal tissue in medical research has been reinvigorated by the release of undercover videos targeting Planned Parenthood officials. Newer, less-controversial technologies, including the “reprogramming” of adult skin cells to create specific types of stem cells, have rendered fetal tissue less central - though still important - to medical research, they said. Dr. Robert Lanza, chief scientific officer of Advanced Cell Technology, said that much of tissue needed for research "can now be generated in the laboratory." At Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, for instance, only about 10 out of 8,000 active research protocols involve fetal tissue, according to an official at the Harvard-affiliated hospital who asked to remain anonymous.



 
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