Medical Alert System, Medical Alarm, Personal Alarm, Emergency Response System and Monitored Smoke Detector  
Life Alert

Call (800) 920 - 3410
  Life Alert HomeSeniors need Life AlertLife Alert Life Saving EquipmentLife Alert Home ProtectionAlternate Communications CapabilityProtection Away From HomeMonitored Fire ProtectionMembers TestimonialsFree Life Alert Brochure Request  

 
Hugh Jackman has another skin cancer growth removed
 

Australian actor Hugh Jackman arrives at the "Tai Hang Fire Dragon Dance" event to celebrate Mid-Autumn Festival during a trip to promote his latest film "Pan" in Hong Kong, China(Reuters) - "X-Men" star Hugh Jackman said on Monday he had another skin cancer growth removed from his nose, and urged people to wear sunscreen. Jackman, 47, posted a photo on his Instagram account, showing a bandage across his nose. It was the Australian actor's 5th known basal cell carcinoma removal since 2013.



FDA Loophole Allows Possibly Dangerous Chemicals in Food
 

The Sustainable Development Goals and the Post-2015 Development AgendaDon't Ask/Don't Tell Food Additive System Puts Many At RiskSince 1958, the FDA has allowed everyday ingredients in food without requiring a lengthy approval process for them. Food companies and their suppliers have never had to prove, for example, that vinegar, vegetable oil or sugar are safe; they are allowed in food under the Generally...



Twin births almost double in rich countries: study
 

Twin births have almost doubled in developed countries in four decadesTwin births have almost doubled in developed countries in four decades, said researchers Monday who cautioned about the associated health risks. In a study published in the US journal Population and Development Review, scientists said the rate of twin births nearly doubled in the United States from 9.5 twins per 1,000 deliveries in 1975, to 16.9 in 2011. "We're not sure if the rate will continue to increase, but the data is increasingly seen as a public health crisis," said Gilles Pison of France's Ined demographic research institute, who co-authored the study.



Corporate winners of Obama budget still face long odds
 

Copies of President Barack Obama's proposed 2016 budget are displayed for sale at the Government Printing Office in WashingtonBy Lewis Krauskopf NEW YORK (Reuters) - Facing a hostile Congress in an election year, President Barack Obama will be hard-pressed to push through many of the proposals in his final budget as U.S. leader. Added funding could benefit suppliers such as Delphi Automotive, Autoliv and Mobileye, which are developing safety features for autonomously driven cars, and Lear, which makes electrical power systems, according to Brian Sponheimer, analyst at Gabelli & Co. "The market discounts that any proposals by this administration will be if not ignored, then outright put down," Sponheimer said. "There clearly is upside if it passes, but there is a very healthy skepticism that that is likely to take place." Obama's plan to fund an overhaul of the nation's infrastructure through a $10-a-barrel tax on crude oil could also boost engineering and construction firms such as Granite Construction said Morris Ajzenman, an analyst at Griffin Securities.



Lives at risk unless WHO reforms, U.N. report says
 

General view of World Health Organization headquarters in GenevaThe World Health Organization needs urgent reform to boost its ability to respond to crises, and failure to act now could cost thousands of lives, according to an advance copy of a high-level U.N. report. The report, entitled "Protecting Humanity from Future Health Crises", is the latest in a series of reviews by global health experts which have been sharply critical of the WHO's response to the devastating Ebola epidemic in West Africa. "This may be the last opportunity to ensure the WHO is empowered" to build an effective emergency response capacity, warned an advance, unedited copy of the report by a U.N. panel, made available online over the weekend in a link on the United Nations' daily Journal website.



Lawyers see limited legal options for workers sent in Zika's way
 

A municipal worker fumigates the parking lot of a building to help control the spread of the mosquito-borne Zika virus in CaracasEmployees of U.S. companies seeking to avoid exposure to the Zika virus likely have few legal avenues to either refuse travel to affected areas or sue if they actually become sick from the virus. Since Zika was detected in Brazil last year, the mosquito-borne virus has spread to 33 countries, most of them in the Americas. The World Health Organization declared an international health emergency because of strong suspicions that infections in pregnant women may cause microcephaly, a condition in which infants are born with abnormally small heads and can suffer developmental problems.



Flashing night-lights may help lessen jet lag, circadian problems
 By Kathryn Doyle (Reuters Health) - Exposing sleeping people to a series of short flashing lights at night might help them adjust more quickly to time zone changes, according to a new U.S. study. In experiments, the technique – which is based on the way non-visual parts of the brain respond to light – was much more effective than sustained bright light similar to that from devices sometimes used to combat sleep disorders or seasonal depression. “Jet lag itself is really a nuisance syndrome as it is self-resolving,” said senior author Jamie Zeitzer, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Stanford University School of Medicine in California.

Concussions May Increase Suicide Risk, Study Finds
 

Concussions May Increase Suicide Risk, Study FindsThe risks of suffering a concussion have been under the spotlight in recent years, especially as the degenerative neurological illness known as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) has been found in multiple football players after their deaths. The degenerative disease is believed to be linked to brain trauma, including concussions. Now, a new study has found that concussions may also be associated with an increase in the long-term risk of suicide.



Parents of Flint, Michigan, toddler sue over lead in water
 

The top of the Flint Water Plant tower is seen in Flint, MichiganThe parents of a 2-year-old Flint, Michigan, girl sued the city and state on Monday over high levels of lead in the child's blood, accusing officials of callous and deliberate indifference over contaminated water. The lawsuit by Flint residents Luke Waid and Michelle Rodriguez said government officials and workers had violated their constitutional rights to due process in the course of switching the source of the city's water to the Flint River from Lake Huron in April 2014.



U.S. researchers find new bacteria that causes Lyme disease
 

A deer tick, or blacklegged tick, Ixodes scapularis, is seen on a blade of grass in this undated picture from the Centers for Disease Control and PreventionBy David Beasley ATLANTA (Reuters) - Researchers have discovered a new bacteria that causes Lyme disease in humans, a U.S. health agency said Monday. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, working with the Mayo Clinic and health officials from Minnesota, Wisconsin and North Dakota, discovered the new bacteria, called Borrelia mayonii, the CDC said in a statement. Previously, only one bacteria, Borrelia burgdorferi, was believed to cause human Lyme disease, which is transmitted through bites from by the blacklegged "deer" tick, the CDC statement said.



It's Time to Enjoy Life: The Enjoy Life Community Program
 Years ago I was the President of the Port Jefferson Station / Terryville Civic Association. During my time as an officer, our organization functioned beyond its primary function of being a community watchdog. Myself, Bill Theis and Jacki Kirsch - our officers, worked to bring the community together, to collaborate with everyone, and to bring...

Chipotle shuts U.S. stores for food safety meeting, rivals pounce
 

A sign is seen posted on the door of a Chipotle Mexican Grill in New YorkChipotle Mexican Grill closed all of its U.S. restaurants during prime lunchtime hours on Monday to hold staff meetings on food safety guidelines, sparking offers from rivals eager to poach customers of the burrito chain as it recovers from several food-borne outbreaks. More than 50,000 Chipotle employees crowded into rented movie theaters and other locations to hear live video feeds of co-Chief Executives Steve Ells and Montgomery Moran laying out their program to improve restaurant safety. Chipotle's shares have lost nearly a third of their value and sales have plunged about 30 percent since November, when first reports of E. Coli sickness linked to the chain emerged.



More evidence there may be no such thing as ‘fat and fit’
 By Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - Obese people have an increased risk of kidney disease even when they don’t have health problems like high blood pressure or elevated blood sugar that can impair renal function, a large Korean study suggests. In otherwise healthy individuals, obesity was linked to 6.7 more cases of kidney disease for every 1,000 people over five years than occurred among normal-weight patients. The findings contradict some previous research that has found people with what’s known as “metabolically healthy obesity” may not face an increased risk of kidney problems, cardiovascular disease or other issues linked to excess weight, said lead study author Dr. Yoosoo Chang of Kangbuk Samsung Hospital Total Healthcare Center in Seoul.

Senator scrutinizes pharma links on government pain panel
 WASHINGTON (AP) — A high-ranking Senate Democrat is scrutinizing links between pharmaceutical companies and government advisers who recently criticized efforts to reduce painkiller prescribing.

Obama seeks funds to fight Zika; sees no cause for panic
 

Press briefing on the Zika virus at the White House in WashingtonBy Roberta Rampton and Ben Hirschler WASHINGTON/LONDON (Reuters) - President Barack Obama will ask the U.S. Congress for more than $1.8 billion in emergency funds to fight Zika at home and abroad and pursue a vaccine, the White House said on Monday, but he added there is no reason to panic over the mosquito-borne virus. Zika, spreading rapidly in South and Central America and the Caribbean, has been linked to severe birth defects in Brazil, and public health officials' concern is focused on pregnant women and women who may become pregnant. Obama's request to Congress includes $200 million for research, development and commercialization of new vaccines and diagnostic tests for the virus.



Novartis sets heart-drug price with two insurers based on health outcome
 

A Novartis logo is pictured on its headquarters building in MumbaiBy Caroline Humer NEW YORK (Reuters) - U.S.-based health insurers Cigna Corp and Aetna Inc. have struck deals with Novartis AG for a performance-based price for the Swiss drugmaker's new heart drug, Entresto, the companies said on Monday. The agreements are among the few performance-based deals that have been made public by drugmakers and U.S. managed-care companies, which say they have been having more discussions about linking price to health outcomes in order to cut unneeded drug spending.



Zika Virus Outbreak Prompts CDC to Activate Highest Emergency Ops Level
 This is only the fourth time that the highest level has been activated.

Citing huge patient load, NY nurses seek rules on staffing
 ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — When the emergency room fills up — whether it's a big accident, flu season or a stroke of misfortune — Brooklyn nurse Rose Green says she can find herself sprinting from room to room, trying to keep ahead of the whims of calamity.

U.S. health official: Widespread Zika vaccine not likely to be available for years
 (Reuters) - U.S. health officials said on Monday that a widespread vaccine to combat the Zika virus will likely not be available for years. Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, told reporters during a briefing at the White House that initial steps are under way but health officials believe it is "unlikely to have vaccine that's widely available for a few years." (Reporting by Clarece Polke; Editing by Chris Reese)

U.S. panel reaffirms depression screening for adolescents
 By Andrew M. Seaman (Reuters Health) - Adolescents between 12 and 18 years old in the U.S. should be screened for depression, according to guidelines reaffirmed by a government-backed panel of prevention experts. "From a parent's perspective, I think it’s important for them to know that depression can be relatively common in adolescence and we have ways to treat it," said Dr. Alex Krist, a member of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) and professor at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond. The USPSTF says about 8 percent of U.S. adolescents experience major depression each year.

After 15 years, cleanup plan approved for contaminated town
 BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency granted final approval Monday to a costly cleanup program for a Montana community where health officials say hundreds of people have been killed by asbestos poisoning.

Exclusive: U.S. athletes should consider skipping Rio if fear Zika - officials
 

Logos of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games and Rio 2016 Paralympic Games are pictured next to a message on a screen that reads "Message about Zika" during a media briefing in Rio de JaneiroBy Daniel Bases and Joshua Schneyer NEW YORK (Reuters) - The United States Olympic Committee told U.S. sports federations that athletes and staff concerned for their health over the Zika virus should consider not going to the Rio 2016 Olympic Games in August. The message was delivered in a conference call involving USOC officials and leaders of U.S. sport federations in late January, according to two people who participated in the call. Federations were told that no one should go to Brazil "if they don't feel comfortable going.



Use sunscreen urges actor Hugh Jackman after cancer removed
 

Use sunscreen urges actor Hugh Jackman after cancer removedAustralian movie star Hugh Jackman has again undergone treatment for skin cancer, urging people Tuesday to wear sunscreen and have regular check-ups. The 47-year-old first had a basal cell carcinoma removed in 2013 after his wife Deborra-Lee Furness told him to get a mark on his nose checked. "An example of what happens when you don't wear sunscreen," he tweeted, alongside a photo of himself with a plaster over his nose.



Sierra Leone discharges last known Ebola patient
 

Children come forward to get their feet disinfected after a Red Cross worker explained that they are spraying bleach, and not spraying the village with the Ebola virus, in ForecariahSierra Leone's last known Ebola patient has been released from hospital, medical officials said on Monday, allowing authorities to begin a six-week countdown before declaring the West African country free of the virus once more. Thirty-eight-year-old Memunatu Kalokoh was discharged on Friday, said Col. Sahr Foday, the head of the Sierra Leone Army Medical Unit where she was admitted. Kalokoh is the aunt of Mariatu Jalloh, the 21-year-old student who died of the virus last month in the same week that the World Health Organization declared the region Ebola-free.



Hawaii's Big Island declares emergency over dengue fever infections
 (Reuters) - The mayor of Hawaii's Big Island declared a state of emergency on Monday to deal with a growing outbreak of dengue fever, spread by infected mosquitoes, with 250 cases confirmed over the past four months. As a result of Hawaii County Mayor Billy Kenoi's order people on the Big Island will be allowed to resume disposing of old tires in landfills, since tires which are left lying around are a known breeding spot for mosquitoes. There have been 250 confirmed cases of dengue fever on the island since Oct. 29, making it the largest outbreak in the state since the 1940s, according to the mayor's declaration and Hawaii health officials.

Battle to place heroin crisis at heart of US election
 

Makeup artist Kriss Blevens, who lost her stepdaughter to adiction, gives an interview in Manchester, New Hampshire, on February 5, 2016New Hampshire may conjure up images of pristine winter skiing, crystal-clear lakes and summer hiking, but scratch the surface and there is a deadly war at the heart of the US presidential campaign. Across New Hampshire there were around 450 overdose deaths in 2015, up from 380 the previous year, say officials. While other US states are fighting the same curse, treatment in New Hampshire lags almost everywhere else in the country.



Nigeria's Dangote Cement gains after plans to expand operations
 

Labourers work at the Dangote Cement factory in Obajana village in Nigeria's central state of KogiNigeria's Dangote Cement share rose sharply on Monday after the firm, majority owned by billionaire Aliko Dangote, announced plans to expand. Dangote Cement shares rose 7.8 percent on the local bourse after it said it plans to build new cement plants in Nigeria and increase local production capacity to 38.25 metric tonnes per year from 29.25 metric tonnes. Dangote Cement, which accounts for a third of the market's capitalisation, traded at 134.98 naira ($0.6783) at the close.



Kenya could pull out of Rio Olympics due to Zika concerns: committee head
 

Logos of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games and Rio 2016 Paralympic Games are pictured next to a message on a screen that reads "Message about Zika" during a media briefing in Rio de JaneiroATHENS (Reuters) - Kenya could pull out of this year's Rio Olympics due to concerns over the Zika virus outbreak in Brazil, the head of Kenya's Olympics committee said on Tuesday. Kenya boasts some of the best middle and long-distance runners in the world and the East African nation topped the medals table at the 2015 World athletics championships. "Obviously, we are not going to risk taking Kenyans there if this Zika Virus reaches epidemic levels," Kipchoge Keino told Reuters. (Writing by Drazen Jorgic; editing by John Stonestreet)



Gov't report: Drop in uninsured in 8 states
 

FILE - In this Nov. 19, 2013, file photo, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention sign is photographed at the agency's federal headquarters in Atlanta. A new government report on health insurance has implications for the presidential campaign. Out Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2016, the National Health Interview Survey says eight states saw a significant drop last year in the number of residents without health insurance. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)WASHINGTON (AP) — Eight states saw a significant drop last year in the number of residents going without health insurance, according to a government report out Tuesday that has implications for the presidential campaign.



Kenya threatens to pull out of Rio Olympics over Zika threat
 

Head of Kenya's Olympics committee Keino speaks during a Reuters interview inside his office in Kenya's capital NairobiKenya threatened on Tuesday to pull its elite runners and other athletes out of the Rio Olympics unless it got assurances they would not be exposed to the Zika virus outbreak in Brazil. Sports authorities across the world are scrambling to find out more about the mosquito-borne virus as they make plans for the games in August. "Obviously, we are not going to risk taking Kenyans there if this Zika Virus reaches epidemic levels.



Sanofi pledges stable 2016 earnings
 

The Sanofi logo is seen at the company's Sanofi Pasteur headquarters in LyonBy Matthias Blamont and Noëlle Mennella PARIS (Reuters) - Sanofi said it expected stable earnings per share this year after reporting lower fourth-quarter income on Tuesday, hurt by declining sales of diabetes and cancer treatments and other prescription drugs. The French drugmaker, which is in the midst of a reorganisation to address falling sales of its best-selling insulin drug Lantus, said sales of its next-generation insulin treatment Toujeo launched last year doubled in the fourth quarter compared with the previous three months. Shares in Sanofi were 0.4 percent lower at 69.6 euros at 0856 GMT, off 11 percent this year and down 25 percent since the company said in November its reorganisation would prevent any meaningful profit growth over the next two years.



Brazilian studies aim to unravel Zika's link to birth defects
 

Rosana Vieira Alves holds her 4-month-old daughter Luana Vieira, who was born with microcephaly, as her daughter Laiane Sophia looks on at their home in OlindaBy Julie Steenhuysen CHICAGO (Reuters) - At Roberto Santos General Hospital in Salvador, Brazil, Dr. Antonio Almeida and a team of specialists are closely following two groups of women: Those who deliver babies with abnormally small heads and those who deliver apparently normal babies. The hospital is one of three in this city on Brazil’s eastern coast where investigators are studying the most urgent question of the Zika outbreak: Is the virus causing a spike in birth defects, and, if so, how great is the risk?     The answer will help shape the response to the rapid spread of Zika throughout the Americas. Concerns over the potential link to microcephaly have prompted a U.S. alert advising pregnant women against travel to 31 countries and territories with outbreaks.



Impact of Zika virus on Olympic preparations
 Sports authorities across the world are scrambling to find out more about the spread of the mosquito-borne Zika virus in Brazil as they make plans for August's Rio Olympics. Below are the latest announcements: AUSTRALIA Australia's Olympic Committee said no athletes have indicated they intended to withdraw, but it would "totally understand" if they did. BRITAIN British Olympic Association Chairman Lord Sebastian Coe said none of the country's athletes were reluctant to go.

Factbox: Impact of Zika virus on Olympic preparations
 (Reuters) - Sports authorities across the world are scrambling to find out more about the spread of the mosquito-borne Zika virus in Brazil as they make plans for August's Rio Olympics. Below are the latest announcements: AUSTRALIA Australia's Olympic Committee said no athletes have indicated they intended to withdraw, but it would "totally understand" if they did. BRITAIN British Olympic Association Chairman Lord Sebastian Coe said none of the country's athletes were reluctant to go.

U.N. refugee agency urges Turkey to open borders to Syrians
 The United Nations called on Turkey on Tuesday to open its borders to thousands of desperate Syrian refugees fleeing Aleppo, in line with its international obligations to protect people fleeing conflict or persecution. William Spindler, spokesman of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), said the agency understood the concern of Turkish authorities about "possible large influxes" into the country, already hosting more than 2.5 million Syrian refugees. "Turkey has also allowed a number of vulnerable and wounded people in Turkey.

EXCLUSIVE-U.S. athletes should consider not attending Olympics if fear Zika-officials
 (Repeats story that was published on Monday) By Daniel Bases and Joshua Schneyer NEW YORK, Feb 8 (Reuters) - The United States Olympic Committee told U.S. sports federations that athletes and staff concerned for their health over the Zika virus should consider not going to the Rio 2016 Olympic Games in August. The message was delivered in a conference call involving USOC officials and leaders of U.S. sport federations in late January, according to two people who participated in the call. Federations were told that no one should go to Brazil "if they don't feel comfortable going.

California 'shaken baby' case in vanguard of new legal challenges
 

Handout photo of Suzanne JohnsonAfter 17 years in prison for an infant's death at her San Diego daycare center, Suzanne Johnson is in the forefront of legal challenges to "shaken baby syndrome" as courts catch up with medical advances in understanding the mechanisms of childhood brain trauma. Appeals such as Johnson's are occurring with greater frequency at both the federal and state level, said Deborah Tuerkheimer, a Northwestern University law professor who wrote a book on the subject. "Criminal convictions are final, and science moves on," she said.



The Science Behind Why You Get Hangry
 

The Science Behind Why You Get HangryPhoto: Pond5By Kelly Fitzpatrick for Life by Daily Burn You know the feeling: You were in a rush out the door and skipped breakfast, or maybe you have a huge dinner planned so you're skimping on your usual afternoon snacks. Slowly but surely, your plain old hunger turns into a simmering grouchiness and you're officially "hangry."While it's not...



Obama to lay out 2017 spending priorities in final White House budget
 

U.S. President Obama answers a reporter's question after delivering a statement on the economy in the press briefing room at the White House in WashingtonU.S. President Barack Obama unveils his final White House budget on Tuesday with a blueprint for fiscal year 2017 that will lay out his spending proposals for priorities from fighting Islamic State to providing for the poor. "That document ... will be President Obama's final vision of how he lays out the fiscal future for the country," said Joel Friedman, vice president for federal fiscal policy at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. Congress can advance elements of the budget without endorsing the entire proposal, which is likely to call for roughly $4 trillion in total spending, in line with Obama's $3.99 trillion proposal for fiscal year 2016.



What will be in Obama's final budget proposal?
 (Reuters) - President Barack Obama is set on Tuesday to unveil his budget proposal for fiscal year 2017, his final year in office.

 
Life Alert® is a registered trademark of Life Alert Emergency Response, Inc.
© Copyright 1987 - 2014, Life Alert, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
UL certified   UL Certified Monitoring Centers