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Suspected cases in Austria not Ebola: ministry
 

This colorized transmission electron micrograph obtained March 24, 2014 from the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta, Georgia, reveals some of the ultrastructural morphology displayed by an Ebola virus virionAustria's health ministry gave the all-clear Tuesday evening after regional authorities earlier reported two suspected cases of Ebola in two men recently returned from Nigeria. "The test results in both cases were negative," the health ministry said. The news came hours after the governor of Upper Austria province, Josef Puehringer, said two men who returned last Wednesday from Lagos had been hospitalised on suspicion of carrying the deadly disease. The two men had been hospitalised in the northern town of Voecklabruck after developing a fever following a work trip to Nigeria.



Liberia imposes night curfew due to Ebola outbreak: state radio
 MONROVIA (Reuters) - Liberia's government imposed a curfew to run from 9 p.m. (2100 GMT) to 6 a.m. in an effort to prevent the spread of the Ebola virus, state radio said on Tuesday. The epidemic of the hemorrhagic disease has killed nearly 1,300 people in Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea and has also affected Nigeria. Between Aug. 14-16, Liberia recorded the most new deaths, 53, followed by Sierra Leone with 17, and Guinea with 14. (Reporting by Alphonso Toweh; Writing by Matthew Mpoke Bigg; Editing by Louise Ireland)

FDA approves Sanofi's Gaucher disease drug Cerdelga
 Food and Drug Administration said on Tuesday it has approved Sanofi SA's drug Cerdelga to treat patients with type 1 Gaucher disease, a rare genetic disorder. The drug was developed by Sanofi's Genzyme unit, which also developed the Gaucher disease drug Cerezyme. Gaucher disease is caused by deficient levels of an enzyme needed to break down certain fats, leading to enlarged liver and spleen. Dr. David Meeker, Genzyme's chief executive, said in an interview that the company plans to price the drug on a par with Cerezyme, which has an average annual cost of about $300,000.

I'm Coming Out of the (Water) Closet
 

I'm Coming Out of the (Water) ClosetPoop. Bowel movements. Diarrhea. Constipation. Bloating. Gas. Cramping. Emergency bathroom stops. Courtesy flushes. Hemorrhoids. These words themselves are taboo subjects for anyone to talk about (women especially) and, yet, here I am coming out of the closet -- the water closet, that is.In my case, blood test for celiac: negative. Endoscopy...



Al Jazeera rejects allegations from Al Gore on Current TV deal
 

A man works at a desk in the Al Jazeera America broadcast center in New York,(Reuters) - Al Jazeera on Tuesday rejected allegations from Al Gore and Joel Hyatt, the founders of Current TV, saying they were false and potentially misleading. Al Jazeera acquired Current TV for an estimated $500 million in 2013. Gore and Hyatt filed a lawsuit against the Qatar, Doha-based company on Friday for fraud and material breaches of the acquisition. Al Jazeera America said in a statement that Gore and Hyatt's assurances of contract compliance were inaccurate and that third parties contend that Current TV breached its contracts while the group ran the channel.



Venezuelan hospitals say shortages creating emergency
 

A maternity center in Caracas, on December 15, 2011Private hospitals and clinics reeling from the shortages that have hit Venezuela urged President Nicolas Maduro on Tuesday to declare a humanitarian emergency over a lack of medicine and supplies. "We ask the national executive to declare a humanitarian emergency in the (health) sector in the face of the worsening shortages and irregular delivery of supplies, medicine, surgical materials, medical equipment and reserve supplies," said Carlos Rosales, head of the Venezuelan Association of Clinics and Hospitals (AVCH).



Time to Put Policy Over Politics
 In August 2012, President Obama extended the policy of deferred action (known as DACA) and provided temporary relief from deportation and made available work permits for certain undocumented children and young adults. For many, this has been nothing short of life-changing.DACA children and young adults, also known as DREAMers, epitomize the...

Top doctor is Nigeria's fifth Ebola death
 

The First Consultants Medical Centre in Lagos, Nigeria, where Patrick Sawyer died from the Ebola virus, is pictured on July 24, 2014A senior doctor who treated Nigeria's first Ebola patient has died, taking the death toll in Africa's most populous country to five, health minister Onyebuchi Chukwu said on Tuesday. Chukwu said the doctor was "the most senior who participated in the management of the (first Ebola) patient" in the country. Liberian-American Patrick Sawyer, 40, died in a Lagos hospital on July 25, five days after arriving at the city's airport visibly unwell on a flight from the Liberian capital, Monrovia. "With this unfortunate development, the total number of Ebola virus-related deaths in Nigeria now stands at five," Chukwu added.



Walking, biking and taking public transit tied to lower weight
 By Andrew M. Seaman NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - People who walk, bike or take public transportation to work tend to be thinner than those who ride in their own cars, according to a new study from the UK. The new findings - including that taking public transportation was just as beneficial as the other “active commuting” modes - point to significant health benefits across society if more people left their cars at home, researchers say. “It seems to suggest switching your commute mode - where you can build in just a bit of incidental physical activity - you may be able to cut down on your chance of being overweight and achieve a healthier body composition as well,” said Ellen Flint, who led the study. Flint and her colleagues from London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and University College London write at TheBMJ.com that physical activity has decreased along with the proportion of people taking active modes of transportation to work.

UK cost agency backs Celgene bone marrow drug in change of tack
 Celgene's drug Revlimid should be an option on Britain's state health service for patients with serious bone marrow disorders and a specific chromosomal abnormality, the country's cost agency said on Wednesday. The final draft guidance from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) represents a change of tack after the medicine was rejected last year for treating myelodysplastic syndromes, which can lead to life-threatening diseases including leukaemia. The latest decision follows the submission of revised analyses from Celgene and further information on the company's proposal to limit the cost of the drug. Celgene has agreed to provide Revlimid free of charge for anyone who needs more than 26 monthly cycles of treatment.

Liberian president orders curfew over Ebola outbreak
 

An Ebola information poster displayed in a street of Monrovia, Liberia, August 6, 2014Monrovia (AFP) - Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf announced a night-time curfew from Wednesday and the quarantine of two neighbourhoods, including one in the capital Monrovia, in a bid to stem the deadly Ebola outbreak.



Liberia president declares Ebola curfew
 

In this undated handout photo provided by Medecins Sans Frontieres, local staff and healthcare workers for Doctors Without Borders, exit an isolation ward in Guekedou, Guinea. For doctors and nurses fighting Ebola in West Africa, working in head-to-toe protective gear in muddy health clinics is often the least of their problems, as many also struggle to convince people they are there to stop Ebola, not spread it. (AP Photo/MSF)MONROVIA, Liberia (AP) — Liberia's president declared a curfew and ordered security forces to quarantine a slum home to at least 50,000 people late Tuesday as the West African country battled to stop the spread of Ebola in the capital.



Study links antibiotic to heart death risk
 

A nurse specific pills at the pharmacy of the Argenteuil hospital, in a Paris suburb on July 23, 2013Danish researchers reported a link Wednesday between a commonly-used antibiotic and a "significantly" higher risk of heart deaths, while observers urged caution in interpreting the results. In a study published online by the British medical journal The BMJ, the team said clarithromycin use was associated with a 76-percent higher risk of cardiac death, compared to use of penicillin V. "The absolute risk difference was 37 cardiac deaths per 1 million courses with clarithromycin," reported the trio from the Statens Serum Institute's epidemiology department in Copenhagen. Clarithromycin is prescribed to millions of people every year, to treat bacterial infections like pneumonia, bronchitis and some skin infections.



Huge discrepancies on heart disease in Europe
 

A nurse pushes a patient on a stretcher on November 9, 2010 at the Hopital Tenon in ParisRussians and Ukrainians aged 55 to 59 die from coronary heart disease at a higher rate than Frenchmen who are 20 years older, a study released Wednesday of Europe's cardiovascular health showed. Drawing on data from the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), the report covering 52 countries noted a generally positive trend, but with huge discrepancies across the region. Cardiovascular disease (CVD), a collection heart and blood vessel conditions that can lead to heart attack and stroke, remained the single biggest killer, claiming over four million lives in Europe per year. This represented nearly half of all deaths, said the study published in the European Heart Journal.



Liberia fights Ebola in capital, W. Africa toll tops 1,200
 

Health workers carry the body of an Ebola virus victim in KenemaBy Stephanie Nebehay MONROVIA/GENEVA (Reuters) - Liberia battled on Tuesday to halt the spread of the Ebola disease in its crowded, run-down oceanside capital Monrovia, recording the most new deaths as fatalities from the world's worst outbreak of the deadly virus rose above 1,200. The epidemic of the hemorrhagic disease, which can kill up to 90 percent of those it infects, is ravaging the three small West African states of Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea, and also has a toehold in Nigeria, Africa's biggest economy. As the Geneva-based World Health Organization rushed to ramp up the global response to the outbreak, including emergency food deliveries to quarantined zones, it announced that deaths from it had risen to 1,229 as of Aug. 16, out of 2,240 cases. Between Aug. 14-16, Liberia recorded the most new deaths, 53, followed by Sierra Leone with 17, and Guinea with 14.



California lawmakers pass bill banning inmate sterilizations
 By Sharon Bernstein SACRAMENTO Calif. (Reuters) - California lawmakers sent a bill to ban sterilization surgeries on inmates in California prisons to Governor Jerry Brown on Tuesday, after media reports and a later audit showed officials failed to follow the state's rules for obtaining consent for the procedure known as tubal ligation from incarcerated women. “Pressuring a vulnerable population into making permanent reproductive choices without informed consent violates our most basic human rights.” The measure passed the Senate floor with a unanimous vote of 33-0 and now goes to Democratic Governor Jerry Brown for his signature. An audit released in June showed that errors were made in obtaining informed consent from 39 women inmates out of 144 who had their tubes tied while incarcerated between 2005 and 2011. Prison rules make tubal ligation available to inmates as part of regular obstetrical care.

Liberia fights Ebola in capital, West Africa toll tops 1,200
 

Health workers, wearing head-to-toe protective gear, prepare for work, outside an isolation unit in Foya District, Lofa County in this handout photoBy Clair MacDougall and Stephanie Nebehay MONROVIA/GENEVA (Reuters) - Liberia battled on Tuesday to halt the spread of the Ebola disease in its crowded, run-down oceanside capital Monrovia, recording the most new deaths as fatalities from the world's worst outbreak of the deadly virus rose above 1,200. The epidemic of the hemorrhagic disease, which can kill up to 90 percent of those it infects, is ravaging the three small West African states of Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea, and also has a toehold in Nigeria, Africa's biggest economy. As the Geneva-based World Health Organization rushed to ramp up the global response to the outbreak, including emergency food deliveries to quarantined zones, it announced that deaths had risen to 1,229 as of Aug. 16, out of 2,240 cases. Between Aug. 14 and 16, Liberia recorded the most new deaths, 53, followed by Sierra Leone with 17 and Guinea with 14.



California may have paid millions for fraudulent drug treatment: audit
 A California program that covers addiction treatments for the poor may have paid $93.7 million in fraudulent claims, a state audit showed. The report released Tuesday by the California State Auditor showed that the state's Drug Medi-Cal program may have paid more than $3 million in claims for patients who were actually dead, and found serious deficiencies in the agency's records for 30 drug treatment program providers. “It is a very troubling audit,” said State Senator Ted Lieu, a Southern California Democrat who requested the audit along with another lawmaker. “It shows that there is significant fraud in California’s Drug Medi-Cal system, and that this fraud has been ongoing for many years.” The audit was spurred by a 2013 investigation by The Center For Investigative Reporting and CNN, which found questionable billing practices at drug-treatment clinics in Southern California.

Liberia imposes curfew as Ebola crisis grows
 

A medical worker checks their protective clothing in a mirror at a clinic in Kailahun, Sierra Leone, on August 15, 2014Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf imposed a nighttime curfew from Wednesday and quarantined two affected neighbourhoods in a bid to stem the Ebola epidemic rampaging through West Africa. The new quarantine areas include Monrovia's West Point slum. Earlier, Liberia's Information Minister Lewis Brown announced the return of 17 missing Ebola patients, who had fled a medical facility in West Point on Saturday after it was attacked by club-wielding youths.



Al Jazeera rejects Al Gore's allegations on Current TV deal
 

A man works at a desk in the Al Jazeera America broadcast center in New York,(Reuters) - TV broadcaster Al Jazeera rejected allegations of fraud and breach of contract leveled by Al Gore and Joel Hyatt over their sale of Current TV to the Middle East-based company in 2013. Third parties contend that Current TV had breached contracts while the group ran the channel, Al Jazeera America said in a statement on Tuesday, adding that assurances by Gore and Hyatt that Current TV's contract compliance were "inaccurate." "Rather than indemnifying Al Jazeera as they were required to do, Gore and Hyatt have resorted to a preemptive lawsuit and lawyer-driven public relations maneuvers," Al Jazeera said.



U.S. hospital breach biggest yet to exploit Heartbleed bug: expert
 

A lock icon, signifying an encrypted Internet connection, is seen on an Internet Explorer browser in ParisHackers who stole the personal data of about 4.5 million patients of hospital group Community Health Systems Inc broke into the company's computer system by exploiting the "Heartbleed" internet bug, making it the first known large-scale cyber attack using the flaw, according to a security expert. The hackers, taking advantage of the pernicious vulnerability that surfaced in April, got into the system by using the Heartbleed bug in equipment made by Juniper Networks Inc, David Kennedy, chief executive of TrustedSec LLC, told Reuters on Wednesday. Community Health Systems said on Monday that the attack had originated in China. Once in, they hacked their way into a database and stole millions of social security numbers and other records, he said.



AstraZeneca and Mitsubishi Tanabe link on diabetes research
 

The logo of AstraZeneca is seen on medication packages in a pharmacy in LondonAstraZeneca and Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma said on Wednesday they said signed a three-year research collaboration into diabetic nephropathy, or kidney failure due to diabetes. Diabetic nephropathy occurs in up to half of patients who have diabetes for 20 years or more.



Cameroon says closes borders with Nigeria in bid to halt Ebola
 

A U.N. convoy of soldiers passes a screen displaying a message on Ebola on a street in AbidjanYAOUNDE (Reuters) - Cameroon has closed all its borders with Nigeria in a bid to halt the spread of the Ebola virus, state radio said on Tuesday. The virus has killed more than 1,200 people in four West African countries, four of whom have died in Nigeria. "The government has taken the decision to protect its population because it is much better to prevent than cure the Ebola virus," Minister of Communications and government spokesman Issa Tchiroma Bakary told Reuters.



9 Best and Worst Ingredients for Your Sandwich
 Here are nine of the best and worst fillings to consider, along with a few tips to prevent sandwich calorie overkill.

Growing number of biosafety labs raises public health concern
 Construction of new biosafety labs a waste of money, possible threat to public health, say reports and experts.

Guru who sparked global yoga craze dies aged 95
 

http://www.bksiyengar.com/BKS Iyengar, the Indian yoga guru credited with helping to fuel a global explosion in the popularity of the ancient spiritual practice, died on Wednesday aged 95, his website said. Iyengar started his yoga school in 1973 in the western city of Pune, developing a unique form of the practice that he said anyone could follow. He wrote many books on yoga, which has been practised in Asia for more than 2,000 years, and has in recent decades become hugely popular around the world. "Long before Christy Turlington was gracing magazine covers, decades before power yoga was a multimillion-dollar business, Mr. Iyengar was teaching Americans, among others, the virtues of asanas and breath control."



Novartis licences drugs to non-profit TB group
 

An Indian tuberculosis patient rests at the Rajan Babu Tuberculosis Hospital in New Delhi on March 24, 2014Swiss-based pharmaceuticals giant Novartis said Wednesday that it had signed a licensing deal with an international organisation that fights tuberculosis. In a statement, the group said that the exclusive worldwide licensing agreement with the Global Alliance for TB Drug Development covered compounds discovered at the Novartis Institutes for Tropical Diseases. Under the terms of agreement, Novartis will fully transfer its TB research and development programme to the Global Alliance. The latter will take financial and operational responsibility for continued research, development, approval and distribution of compounds in the portfolio, Novartis said.



Ukraine maternity ward nurtures new life as the shells fall
 

A maternity ward damaged by shelling is seen in SlavianskBy Thomas Grove DONETSK Ukraine (Reuters) - In a Ukrainian city stalked by death, Tatyana Makarchuk, the director of Donetsk Maternity Hospital No. 3, is making sure that new life can survive. Donetsk is becoming a battle zone as government forces press an offensive intended to crush pro-Moscow separatists who have made the city in eastern Ukraine their main stronghold. Ukraine's Western-backed government denies shelling civilian areas, but ordinary people are being caught up in the fighting, including expectant mothers and babies.



Vietnam, Myanmar test three patients for Ebola
 

A worker holds a flyer on the Ebola virus at the Murtala Muhammed International Airport in Lagos on August 11, 2014Vietnam and Myanmar are testing three patients for the deadly Ebola virus after they arrived in the Southeast Asian nations from Africa while suffering from fever, health officials said. Two Nigerians were sent to Ho Chi Minh City's Tropical Diseases Hospital for isolation after they arrived in the city by plane, Vietnam's health ministry said, adding that they did not have symptoms other than fever. Airline passengers sitting next to the pair -- who travelled to Vietnam on Monday from Nigeria via Qatar -- have been advised to monitor their own health.



Liberian police fire tear gas to disperse protest over Ebola quarantine
 

Soldiers from the Liberian army monitor a border checkpoint as part of Operation White Shield to control the Ebola outbreak, at an entrance to Bomi County in northwestern LiberiaBy Clair MacDougall MONROVIA (Reuters) - Police in the Liberian capital Monrovia fired tear gas on Wednesday to disperse a stone-throwing crowd agitating to leave a neighbourhood placed under quarantine because of the Ebola virus, witnesses said. Liberian authorities introduced a nationwide curfew on Tuesday and put the neighbourhood - West Point - under quarantine.



France urges Israel, Palestinians to talk after ceasefire ends
 French President Francois Hollande called on Israel and the Palestinians to resume truce talks after a Gaza ceasefire collapsed and said the demilitarization of the enclave and a lifting of a blockade should be part of a deal. Israeli air strikes killed 11 Palestinians in Gaza, including the wife and infant son of Hamas's military leader, Mohammed Deif, in what the group said was an attempt to assassinate him after the failure of Egyptian-brokered negotiations. France supports the Egyptian mediation," Hollande told Le Monde in an interview.

Novartis hands over experimental TB drugs in antibiotic pullback
 

Logo of Swiss drugmaker Novartis is seen at its headquarters in BaselBy Caroline Copley ZURICH (Reuters) - Novartis has signed a licensing deal to hand over its experimental tuberculosis (TB) drugs to the Global Alliance for TB Drug Development, joining a growing Big Pharma retreat from antibiotics. The TB Alliance deal reflects renewed scrutiny of the Novartis portfolio under new chairman Joerg Reinhardt, who is focusing the Swiss company's research on core areas such as cancer, respiratory drugs, heart failure and dermatology. "Novartis is not really focused on anti-infectives, so I think it makes sense," Kepler Cheuvreux analyst Fabian Wenner said of the licensing deal. Under the terms of Wednesday's agreement, TB Alliance will fund further research and development and be responsible for seeking approval and commercializing the TB treatments discovered at the Novartis Institute for Tropical Disease.



Indian hunger striker freed after 14 years as suicide charges dropped
 

Irom Sharmila freed after 14 yearsAn Indian human rights activist who has been on hunger strike for the last 14 years in protest against alleged army atrocities on Wednesday walked free from a prison hospital where doctors had force fed her to keep her alive. Irom Sharmila's release comes after a trial judge found no evidence to support charges filed in 2000 by prosecutors in the northeastern state of Manipur that she was trying to commit suicide by refusing food. My battle against injustice and crimes committed by the army in Manipur will continue," Sharmila told Reuters by telephone as she waited to leave the hospital in state capital, Imphal. Answering a question, she said she would continue her hunger strike.



Chinese police arrest three for deadly auto parts factory blast
 

Firefighter trucks are seen next to a damaged building after an explosion at a factory in ZhoushanChinese police have arrested three people in connection with an explosion at an auto parts plant that killed 75 people in China's worst industrial accident in a year, state media said on Wednesday. The three were Wu Chi-tao, chairman of Kunshan Zhongrong Metal Products Co. Ltd, the company that owned the workshop, and the company's general manager and a manager in charge of workplace safety, state news agency Xinhua said. Kunshan Zhongrong's safety facilities were insufficient, the working environment was bad and production methods were illegal, Xinhua said earlier, citing the investigation's initial results. A room filled with metal dust exploded this month in the eastern province of Jiangsu at the Kunshan Zhongrong factory that polishes wheel hubs for car makers, including General Motors Co, killing 75 people and injuring 185.



Aid airlift to northern Iraq has started, U.N. says
 A humanitarian airlift to northern Iraq began on Wednesday, kicking off a 10-day operation to provide tents and other aid to half a million displaced people who are struggling for survival, the United Nations' refugee agency UNHCR said. "This is a massive logistics operation ... to help the hundreds of thousands of desperate people who have fled suddenly with nothing but their lives and are now struggling to survive in harsh conditions," said U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees Antonio Guterres.  Hundreds of thousands have fled their homes since the militant Islamic State group swept through much of the north and west of Iraq in June, threatening to break up the country. Iraq's escalating crisis means that the Kurdistan region of northern Iraq is now hosting more than 600,000 internally displaced civilians, including more than 200,000 people who fled the Sinjar area since early August, the UNHCR said. In all, an estimated 1.2 million people have been uprooted in Iraq so far this year, including half a million in the western Anbar region, it said.

Illness with Ebola-like symptoms kills several in Congo: locals
 Democratic Republic of Congo has sent its health minister and a team of experts to the remote northern Equateur province after several people died there from a disease with Ebola-like symptoms, a local official and a professor said on Wednesday. "An illness is spreading in Boende but we don't know the origin," said Michel Wangi, a spokesman for the governor's office. "The government has sent a team of experts from the INRB(National Institute of Biomedical Research) this morning led by the health minister (Felix) Kabange Numbi and acting governor Sebastian Impeto." A professor accompanying the delegation in the presidential plane confirmed that they were en route this morning to find out "the exact nature of the illness that caused the Boende deaths". An Equateur resident who asked not to be named said that around ten people had died, including four health care workers, after suffering from fever, diarrhoea and bleeding from the ears and nostrils - all symptoms of the deadly Ebola virus.

Amicus's lead drug nears approval as late-stage trial succeeds
 (Reuters) - Amicus Therapeutics Inc moved a step closer to bringing its first drug to the market after trial results paved the way for its lead drug to become the first oral treatment for patients with a disorder that causes an abnormal build-up of fat. The drug developer's stock jumped 20 percent to $5.47 in early trading on Wednesday after the results from the second late-stage trial were released. Amicus said data from the study showed its drug, migalastat, was as effective as enzyme replacement therapies (ERTs) - the current standard of care - over an 18 month treatment period in 60 patients with a form of Fabry disease. Amicus has started submitting trial data to the European health regulator and plans to meet the U.S.

Texas abortion law could send women across borders
 

The Women's Reproductive clinic is seen in Santa Teresa, New Mexico, Monday, Aug. 11, 2014. If the new abortion law, one of the toughest in the nation, is upheld by a federal judge, the only remaininc abortion clinic in El Paso, across the state border from Santa Teresa, will be forced to close due to new requirements and women will have to travel hundreds of miles or go to New Mexico to obtain an abortion. (AP Photo/Juan Carlos Llorca)EL PASO, Texas (AP) — Crossing borders is a part of life in El Paso in far West Texas, where people may walk into Mexico to visit family or commute to New Mexico for work. But getting an abortion doesn't require leaving town.



Ebola: Questions, answers about an unproven drug
 WASHINGTON (AP) — An experimental Ebola drug has been used to treat two American aid workers and a Spanish missionary priest. Could Liberian doctors be next?

Deadline to clear up health law eligibility near
 

FILE - This Nov. 29, 2013, file photo shows a part of the HealthCare.gov website, photographed in Washington. The administration is warning hundreds of thousands of consumers they risk losing taxpayer-subsidized health insurance unless they act quickly to resolve issues about their citizenship and immigration status. (AP Photo/Jon Elswick, File)WASHINGTON (AP) — The clock is ticking for hundreds of thousands of people who have unresolved issues affecting their coverage under the new health care law.



 
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